Vol.5 n°12 december 1980

Vol.5 n°12 december 1980

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

Foreground

p.24 MULTIMACHINE GAMES

The most exciting computer games are those with two machines and two or more players.

[author : Ken Wasserman and Tim Stryker]

p.44 COMPUTERIZED TESTING

A computer is useful for automating any process-even hardware testing.

[author : Steve Ciarcia]

p.96 GRAPHIC COLOR SLIDES, PART 2

This month we demonstrate the use of subroutines to generate equation plots, histograms, regression and monthly analysis graphs.

[author : Alan W Grogono]

p.120 MICROGRAPH, PART 2: VIDEO-DISPLAY PROCESSOR

Part 2 details more about this surprisingly simple high-resolution video display.

[author : E Grady Booch]

p.192 PIRATE'S ADVENTURE

The man who first brought Adventure games to microcomputers gives us an entire listing of one of his most enjoyable games.

[author : Scott Adams]

p.244 A POCKET COMPUTER? SIZING UP THE HP41C

This device comes close to being the world's first pocket-sized personal computer.

[author : Bruce Carbrey]

p.268 LOST DUTCHMAN'S GOLD

Applesoft BASIC is well suited to the writing of games, as this program shows.

[author : Bob Liddil and Ten Li]

Background

p.142 A SIMPLIFIED THEORY OF VIDEO GRAPHICS, PART 2

Explanations of color-video techniques and some of the quirks of microprocessor systems are provided.

[author : Allen Watson III]

p.158 ON THE ROAD TO ADVENTURE

Along with a survey of the major Adventure games, here's an explanation of how to play them.

[author : Bob Liddil]

p.172 ZORK AND THE FUTURE OF COMPUTERIZED FANTASY SIMULATIONS

One of the authors of Zork describes his game and how similar games may appear in the future.

[author : P David Lebling]

p.186 CHARACTER VARIATION IN ROLE-PLAYING GAMES

A variable set of character traits can be used to create a game of high adventure that is different every time you play it.

[author : Jon Freeman]

Product Reviews: Games

p.74 DUNGEON CAMPAIGN

p.78 A STELLAR TREK

p.84 MORLOC'S TOWER

p.90 ODYSSEY: THE COMPLEAT APVENTURE

p.114 SARGON II

p.264 MICROSOFT ADVENTURE

p.282 COMPUTER BISMARCK

Nucleus

p.6 Editorial: What's Wrong With Technical Writing Today?

p.14 Letters

p.94 Technical Forum: The Twelve Computerized Days of Christmas

p.214 BYTELINES

p.222 User's Column

p.288 Programming Quickies: Monster Combat

p.294 BYTE's Bugs

p.296, 325, 326 BYTE's Bits

p.306 Clubs and Newsletters

p.314 Event Queue

p.318 Ask BYTE

p.322 Books Received

p.324 Software Received

p.342 What's New?

p.398 Unclassified Ads

p.399 BOMB, BOMB Results

p.400 Reader Service

In This Issue

Although the mysteries and menaces lurking in the shadows of this issue's cover may exist only in the minds of an imaginative Adventure player or the cover artist, Robert Tinney, that doesn't make them any less real to the person playing the game. This issue explores the many aspects of Adventure and Adventure-like games. It includes two complete Adventures in BASIC, an excellent introductory article ("On the Road to Adventure," by Bob Liddil), two articles on the state of the art in Adventure games, and a handful of game reviews.

This issue also contains "Computer Testing," an article by Steve Ciarcia, as well as the second parts of several articles continued from the November graphics issue: "Micrograph," "Graphic Color Slides," and "A Simplified Theory of Video Graphics."