Vol.4 n°1 january 1979

Vol.4 n°1 january 1979

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

Foreground

p.56 BUILD A COMPUTER CONTROLLED SECURITY SYSTEM FOR YOUR HOME

Protecting your home with your personal computer-Part 1 of a 3 part series

[author : Steve Ciarcia]

p.84 A COMPUTERIZED MAILING LIST

A practical application for your floppy disk computer system

[author : Thomas E Doyle]

p.90 LIFE ALGORITHMS

Efficient methods for programming John Conway's game of Life

[author : Mark D Nierniec]

p.104 POLYPHONY MADE EASY

Play chords instead of just single notes with your computer

[author : Steven K Roberts]

p.186 AN AUDIBLE LOGIC TEST PROBE

Change voltage levels to musical tones for quick troubleshooting

[author : James L Woodward]

p.190 HISTORY OF COMPUTERS: The IBM 704

Concerning one of the last vacuum tube computers

[author : Keith S Reid-Green]

Background

p.14 A MICROPROCESSOR FOR THE REVOLUTION: THE 6809

The successor to the 6800 described by its designers in the first of a 3 part series

[author : Terry Ritter and Joel Boney]

p.74 AN EXPOSURE TO MUMPS

First designed for medical applications, this high levet language is diversifying

[author : David D Sherertz]

p.100 THE DIGICAST SYSTEM: Receiving Data and Information Over Your FM Radio

Receiving computer programs over FM subcarrier bands

[author : A I Halsema]

p.110 GRANDMASTER WALTER BROWNE VERSUS CHESS 4.6

The continuing saga of Chess 4.6, this time in a simultaneous exhibition by a Grandmaster

[author : John R Douglas]

p.116 AN INTRODUCTION TO BNF

Introduction to Backus-Naur Form, an abbreviation method used in compiler and interpreter design

[author : W D Maurer]

p.126 CREATING A CHESS PLAYER, Part 4: Strategy in Computer Chess

Optimizing end game evaluation on the computer

[author : Peter W Frey and Larry R Atkin]

p.146 IPS, AN UNORTHODOX HIGH LEVEL LANGUAGE

A machine independent high level language interpreter

[author : Dr Karl Meinzer]

p.174 GOTOlocks AND THE THREE SORTS

A tale told by a PUNdit of a sort

[author : Gwen Hadley]

p.182 ELEMENTS OF STATISTICAL COMPUTATION

How to calculate means and standard deviations

[author : Alan B Forsythe]

Nucleus

p.4 In This BYTE

p.6 A Short Note on Pascal Progress and Other Topics

p.10 Letters

p.49 Book Reviews

p.52 Machine Language Puzzler: Memory Meanderings

p.53 BYTE's Bugs

p.54 Technical Forum: Comments on S-100 Bus Extension

p.160 Clubs and Newsletters

p.162 BYTE's Bits

p.170 Desk Top Wonder: Some Random Games

p.176 Nybbles: A Micro Word Processor

p.179 Programming Quickies: Single Stepping the 8080 Processor

p.188 Event Queue

p.193 What's New?

p.222 Unclassitied Ads

p.224 BOMB, Reader Service

Cover Art: SCULPTING THE NEW TITANS

[author : Robert Tinney]

In this BYTE

p.14 This month's cover is entitled Sculpting the New Titans, a fantasy by Robert Tinney that emphasizes the new crop of innovative circuitry being chipped out of silicon by microcomputer engineers. Of course, in real life the tools are more likely to be a computer, plotter, and wafer fabrication facility. Among the new devices is Motorola's new 6809 processor, expected to be available in the next few months. Successor to the 6800, the 6809 is an 8 bit processor that can perform 16 bit operations. The two chief architects of the 6809, Terry Ritter and Joel Boney, begin a 3 part discussion of the new circuit in A Microprocessor for the Revolution : The 6809, Part 1: Design Philosophy. page 14

p.56 This month Steve Ciarcia begins the 3 part series, Build a Computer Controlled Security System for Your Home. Part 1 covers everyth ing you need to keep your home or business secure, from the right types of sensors to detailed software examples. page 56

p.74 Of the four standard languages of the American National Standards Institute BASIC, FORTRAN and PL/1 are fa miliar. Less so is MUMPS, used for many business and science applications. Get An Exposure to MUMPS in David Sherertz' article. page 74

p.84 Implementing a mailing list on your computer is a practical application for many personal computer experimenters. If you have a floppy disk based system, read A Computerized Mailing List by Thomas E Doyle and find out how easy it is to do. page 84

p.90 Last month David Buckingham described interesting and intricate patterns that occur in John H Conway's game of Life. This month we take a look at some of the methods and schemes for implementing a Life program on your computer. Mark D Niemiec reveals a Life enthusiast's trade secrets in Life Algorithms. page 90

p.100 In The Digicast System A I Halsema describes a new technique for receiving computer programs and information broadcast over the subcarrier frequency bands of FM radio stations. Similar systems are now in operation in Europe. page 100

p.104 One of the problems in creating computer synthesized music is that many systems all ow only one note at a time to be entered - a time-consuming restriction . Steven Roberts describes a way around the dilemma in Polyphony Made Easy. page 104

p.110 Computers cannot play perfect chess, but sometimes a computer program can do surprisingly well. The human United States chess champion discovered this fact while competing against the world champion computer chess program. That confrontation was recorded by J R Douglas in Grandmaster Walter Browne versus Chess 4.6. page 110

p.116 BNF (Backus Norm al Form or Backus-Naur Form) is a standardized method for abbreviating certain statements made about programming languages. Used extensively in books and articles de aling with compiler and interpreter design, it is explained for those new to the subject in W D Maurer's article, An Introduction to BNF. page 116

p.126 In Creating a Chess Player, Part 4: Strategy in Computer Chess, authors Peter Frey and Larry Atkin describe some clever optimization techniques that can significantly reduce the amount of computer time needed to evaluate end game positions. page 126

p.146 In this issue's Languages Forum: IPS, An Unorthodox High Level Language, Karl Meinzer presents an introduction to his creation, a machine independent high level language interpreter presently implemented for the RCA 1802 and 8080 processors. page 146

p.174 Test your computer vocabulary by puzzling over Gwen Hadley's story of GOTO locks and the Three Sorts. page 174

p.182 In Elements of Statistical Computation, Alan Forsythe covers some of the dos and don'ts of determining the mean and standard deviation of a set of data. page 182

p.186 Logic probes are handy for troubleshooting digital logic. Read about James L Woodward's circuit in An Audible Logic Test Probe. It plays two tones through a speaker corresponding to high or low logic levels, and it costs very little. page 186

p.190 We tend to take the microprocessors of today for granted, forgetting the power hungry days of the 1950s. In his article, History of Computers: The IBM 704, Keith ReidGreen looks at one of the last vacuum tube computers to be commercially marketed. page 190