Vol.4 n°12 december 1979

Vol.4 n°12 december 1979

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

Foreground

p.10 FREQUENCY ANALYSIS OF DATA USING A MICROCOMPUTER

p.10 FREQUENCY ANALYSIS OF DATA USING A MICROCOMPUTER

Application of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT)

[author : F R Ruckdeschel]

p.36 ADD NONVOLATILE MEMORY TO YOUR COMPUTER

p.36 ADD NONVOLATILE MEMORY TO YOUR COMPUTER

Using electrically alterable read-only memory as a "read-mostly" memory

[author : Steve Ciarcia]

p.54 FASTER AUDIO PROCESSING WITH A MICROPROCESSOR

p.54 FASTER AUDIO PROCESSING WITH A MICROPROCESSOR

Selected hardware circuits make possible higher-fidelity processing systems

[author : William J Dally]

p.120 ANALYSIS OF POLYNOMIAL FUNCTIONS WITH THE TI-59 CALCULATOR

A hand-held approach to numerical analysis

[author : Pierre Chance]

p.134 MINIMIZING CURVE-PLOTTING CALCULATION

p.134 MINIMIZING CURVE-PLOTTING CALCULATION

Curve-plotting routine for the Hewlett-Packard 9825A computer

[author : Timothy G Bowker]

p.144 NONITERATIVE DIGITAL SOLUTION OF LINEAR TRANSFER FUNCTIONS

p.144 NONITERATIVE DIGITAL SOLUTION OF LINEAR TRANSFER FUNCTIONS

The analysis of the response of dynamic systems

[author : Bryan Finlay]

Background

p.106 TEXT COMPRESSION

p.106 TEXT COMPRESSION

Decrease necessary storage space with Huffman codes

[author : James L Peterson]

p.196 A USER'S LOOK AT TINY-C

p.196 A USER'S LOOK AT TINY-C

Commentary on tiny-c

[author : Christopher O Kern]

p.222 SOME NOTES ON MODULAR ASSEMBLY PROGRAMMING

p.222 SOME NOTES ON MODULAR ASSEMBLY PROGRAMMING

Modular programs aid design and implementation

[author : James Lewis]

p.241 TWENTY-FOUR WAYS TO WRITE A LOOP

p.241 TWENTY-FOUR WAYS TO WRITE A LOOP

Dr Maurer takes you through a loop

[author : W D Maurer]

p.247 MORSE CODE TRAINER

p.247 MORSE CODE TRAINER

Use your computer to train with Morse code recognition

[author : Mark Bernstein]

p.250 THIRTY DAYS TO FASTER INPUT

p.250 THIRTY DAYS TO FASTER INPUT

Improve your touch typing skills

[author : Arthur Armstrong]

Nucleus

p.6 Editorial, On the Importance of Casting Abstractions

p.6 Editorial, On the Importance of Casting Abstractions

p.78 Letters

p.78 Letters

p.82 Technical Forum

p.82 Technical Forum

p.87 Programming Quickies

p.87 Programming Quickies

p.88 Languages Forum

p.88 Languages Forum

p.100 BYTE's Bits

p.100 BYTE's Bits

p.102, 210, 249 BYTE's Bugs

p.102, 210, 249 BYTE's Bugs

p.103 BYTE News

p.103 BYTE News

p.228 Event Queue

p.228 Event Queue

p.252 What's New?

p.252 What's New?

p.303 (p.287) Unclassified Ads

p.303 (p.287) Unclassified Ads

p.304 (p.288) Reader Service, BOMB

p.304 (p.288) Reader Service, BOMB

Cover Art: Numerical Analysis

[author : Robert Tinney]

In this BYTE

About the Cover: This month's cover features artist Robert Tinney's concrete realization of the theme for several articles in this issue: today's tools of analysis and design are computers, both as calculating-engines and as nontraditional symbol-manipulators. By implication, if Leibniz were alive today he would be employing a friendly desktop computer as a tool for examination of concepts ranging far beyond the calculus he helped shape.

p.10 The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is a unique algorithm that is necessary for the analysis and reproduction of signal waveforms. However, performing a complex mathematical derivation of the concept is not necessary. Fred Ruckdeschel has formulated a nonrigorous mathematical treatment of the FFT and demonstrates how it may be applied to synthesize a variety of waveforms in the Frequency Analysis of Data Using a Microcomputer. Page 10

p.10 The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is a unique algorithm that is necessary for the analysis and reproduction of signal waveforms. However, performing a complex mathematical derivation of the concept is not necessary. Fred Ruckdeschel has formulated a nonrigorous mathematical treatment of the FFT and demonstrates how it may be applied to synthesize a variety of waveforms in the Frequency Analysis of Data Using a Microcomputer. Page 10

p.36 Does data evaporate from your computer's volatile programmable memory when you turn the power off? Perhaps you could benefit from having some nonvolatile memory in your machine. Steve Ciarcia explores the useful properties of electrically alterable read-only memory as he tells how to Add Nonvolatile Memory to Your Computer. Page 36

p.36 Does data evaporate from your computer's volatile programmable memory when you turn the power off? Perhaps you could benefit from having some nonvolatile memory in your machine. Steve Ciarcia explores the useful properties of electrically alterable read-only memory as he tells how to Add Nonvolatile Memory to Your Computer. Page 36

p.54 After finding softwareintensive approaches to audio processing too slow for high fidelity sound, William J Dally set out to develop a system that uses hardware to speed up processing of audio signals. He explains his ideas in Faster Audio Processing with a Microprocessor. Page 54

p.54 After finding softwareintensive approaches to audio processing too slow for high fidelity sound, William J Dally set out to develop a system that uses hardware to speed up processing of audio signals. He explains his ideas in Faster Audio Processing with a Microprocessor. Page 54

p.106 Huffman code is a method for compressing text characters by exploiting their relative frequency of occurrence in text. Space savings of up to 50% can be realized using this technique. James Peterson discusses the advantages and tradeoffs involved in this and other types of Text Compression. Page 106

p.106 Huffman code is a method for compressing text characters by exploiting their relative frequency of occurrence in text. Space savings of up to 50% can be realized using this technique. James Peterson discusses the advantages and tradeoffs involved in this and other types of Text Compression. Page 106

p.120 Numerical analysis techniques are quite often simplified by the use of powerful number handling algorithms available on large computer systems. A reasonable alternative to such analysis for the small-scale computer user lies in the utilization of the hand calculator. Small calculators continue to expand their capabilities as proven by Pierre Chance in his investigation of Analysis of Polynomial Functions with the TI-59 Calculator. Page 120

p.134 Most methods of estimating a particular function and plotting it require an analysis involving calculus. Timothy Bowker has written a program that performs a simple trigonometric analysis of a function which will yield an accurate approximation of the function and then print the curve on a HewlettPackard 9872A plotter. See his article entitled Minimizing Curve-Plotting Calculation. Page 134

p.134 Most methods of estimating a particular function and plotting it require an analysis involving calculus. Timothy Bowker has written a program that performs a simple trigonometric analysis of a function which will yield an accurate approximation of the function and then print the curve on a HewlettPackard 9872A plotter. See his article entitled Minimizing Curve-Plotting Calculation. Page 134

p.144 In the analysis of system response, the utility of the transfer function is immeasurable. The transfer function will convert a time domain relationship into a frequency domain relationship, a manipulation that can prove to simplify the solution process . Bryan Finlay presents a clear picture of the concepts involved in a Noniterative Digital Solution of Linear Transfer Functions. Page 144

p.144 In the analysis of system response, the utility of the transfer function is immeasurable. The transfer function will convert a time domain relationship into a frequency domain relationship, a manipulation that can prove to simplify the solution process . Bryan Finlay presents a clear picture of the concepts involved in a Noniterative Digital Solution of Linear Transfer Functions. Page 144

p.196 The usefulness of microcomputers is increasing as more powerful and varied programming languages are implemented. Christnpher Kern provides A User's Look at Tiny-c, one of the more recent languages to appear. Page 196

p.196 The usefulness of microcomputers is increasing as more powerful and varied programming languages are implemented. Christnpher Kern provides A User's Look at Tiny-c, one of the more recent languages to appear. Page 196

p.222 Some Notes on Modular Assembly Programming presents several examples of well-written assembler programs. James Lewis feels that a structured approach to program writing helps both the design and implementation processes. Page 222

p.222 Some Notes on Modular Assembly Programming presents several examples of well-written assembler programs. James Lewis feels that a structured approach to program writing helps both the design and implementation processes. Page 222

p.241 Many people use loops in computer programs without really thinking about how they work. In Twenty-four Ways to Write a Loop, W D Maurer illustrates the endless variety of program loops and shows you how to get the most out of them. Page 241

p.241 Many people use loops in computer programs without really thinking about how they work. In Twenty-four Ways to Write a Loop, W D Maurer illustrates the endless variety of program loops and shows you how to get the most out of them. Page 241

p.247 If you're interested in using your computer to learn Morse code, Mark Bernstein's Morse Code Trainer can help you to practice. His program translates plain text into Morse code and then outputs it through a speaker. Page 247

p.247 If you're interested in using your computer to learn Morse code, Mark Bernstein's Morse Code Trainer can help you to practice. His program translates plain text into Morse code and then outputs it through a speaker. Page 247

p.250 Does it take you ten minutes to enter twenty lines of code at your terminal? Are your index fingers worn out from hours of hunting and pecking? Why not use your own computer to learn the useful art of touch typing. Read Arthur Armstrong's article, Thirty Days To a Faster Input. Page 250

p.250 Does it take you ten minutes to enter twenty lines of code at your terminal? Are your index fingers worn out from hours of hunting and pecking? Why not use your own computer to learn the useful art of touch typing. Read Arthur Armstrong's article, Thirty Days To a Faster Input. Page 250