Vol.2 n°7 july 1977

Vol.2 n°7 july 1977

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

Foreground

p.12 HOW TO COMPUTERIZE YOUR MODEL RAILROAD

p.12 HOW TO COMPUTERIZE YOUR MODEL RAILROAD

[theme : Applications] [author : Brown]

p.36 THIS CIRCUIT MULTIPLIES

p.36 THIS CIRCUIT MULTIPLIES

[theme : Arithmetic Hardware] [author : Hall]

p.52 THE TV OSCILLOSCOPE

p.52 THE TV OSCILLOSCOPE

[theme : Hardware] [author : Barbier]

p.64 SPEECH RECOGNITION FOR A PERSONAL COMPUTER SYSTEM

p.64 SPEECH RECOGNITION FOR A PERSONAL COMPUTER SYSTEM

[theme : Peripherals] [author : Boddie]

p.92 A MACHINE CODE RELOCATOR FOR THE 8080

p.92 A MACHINE CODE RELOCATOR FOR THE 8080

[theme : Software] [author : Zolman]

p.118 HOW FAR-WHICH WAY?

p.118 HOW FAR-WHICH WAY?

[theme : Applications] [author : Pittet]

p.122 ADD CURSOR CONTROL TO YOUR TVT II

p.122 ADD CURSOR CONTROL TO YOUR TVT II

[theme : Hardware] [author : McGahee]

p.126 GIVING KIM SOME FANCY JEWELS

p.126 GIVING KIM SOME FANCY JEWELS

[theme : Hardware] [author : Grater]

Background

p.42 CONDENSED REFERENCE CHART FOR THE 6800

p.42 CONDENSED REFERENCE CHART FOR THE 6800

[theme : Reference Materials] [author : Borrmann]

p.44 A TRAIN CONTROL DISPLAY USING THE LSI-11 MICROCOMPUTER

p.44 A TRAIN CONTROL DISPLAY USING THE LSI-11 MICROCOMPUTER

[theme : Applications] [author : Hart-Badger]

p.72 HOW TO PICK UP A DROPPED BIT

p.72 HOW TO PICK UP A DROPPED BIT

[theme : Error Theory] [author : Maurer]

p.78 GIVE YOUR MICRO A MEGABYTE

p.78 GIVE YOUR MICRO A MEGABYTE

[theme : System Design] [author : Grappel]

p.82 AN INTRODUCTION TO NUMBERS

p.82 AN INTRODUCTION TO NUMBERS

[theme : Software] [author : Simmons]

p.96 BASICally BASIC

p.96 BASICally BASIC

[theme : Software] [author : Baker]

Nucleus

p.4 In This BYTE

p.4 In This BYTE

p.6 This Elephant Never Forgets

p.6 This Elephant Never Forgets

p.10 Letters

p.10 Letters

p.25 West Coast Computer Faire

p.25 West Coast Computer Faire

p.32, 115, 129 What's New?

p.32, 115, 129 What's New?

p.34, 150 Technical Forum

p.34, 150 Technical Forum

p.41 Ask BYTE

p.41 Ask BYTE

p.57 BYTE's Bugs

p.57 BYTE's Bugs

p.90 Desk Top Wonders: Jeu de NIM, Peut Être?

p.90 Desk Top Wonders: Jeu de NIM, Peut Être?

p.124 Classified Ads

p.124 Classified Ads

p.128 PAPERBYTES Forum

p.128 PAPERBYTES Forum

p.142,166 Programming Quickies

p.142,166 Programming Quickies

p.151 Book Reviews

p.151 Book Reviews

p.155,158 BYTE's Bits

p.155,158 BYTE's Bits

p.156 PAPERBYTES: Floppy Disk Object Code

p.156 PAPERBYTES: Floppy Disk Object Code

p.160 Clubs, Newsletters

p.160 Clubs, Newsletters

p.176 BOMB

p.176 BOMB

p.176 Reader Service

p.176 Reader Service

In this BYTE

Model railroading can give the computer hobbyist an action packed computer application. Before tackling the job, however, it is important to have a firm understanding of what's involved in the design of a model railroad. In his article, How to Computerize Your Model Railroad, David C Brown explains in detail the problems faced by the model railroader and points to ways in which they can be solved. He then goes on to cover the requirements for microprocessor interfaces to the model railroad and some thoughts on the software of an operating system to give realism to the model.

Sometimes a small amount of hardware can speed up software considerably. A perfect example is provided by Tom Hall in his article which shows how This Circuit Multiplies. This circuit is a hardware multiplier which takes 8 bit operands and replies (ten clock periods later) with a 16 bit product. Here is an example of putting an inner loop into hardware, thereby speeding up an operation.

The model railroad is an ideal way for the personal computing enthusiast to enter the fascinating world of real time control: such a system is realistic but manageable. Authors Jack Hart and Ed Badger show you how they did it in A Train Control Display Using the LSI-11 Microcomputer.

Sometimes a bit of serendipity falls out of an application or project. Ken Barbier describes one such case in the form of his technique of using a television display circuit's ability to generate a raster with various synchronous patterns to debug and verify its operation. Read The TV Oscilloscope.

There are many ways to make a computer talk, but how do you get it to listen? Speech Recognition for a Personal Computer System discusses a topic which has fascinated and frustrated experimenters for years. Author James Boddie of Bell Labs (the pioneer researchers in the field) covers the history of the subject and presents a practical system which can be realized by a personal computing experimenter.

Real world systems may not be perfect, yet programming demands perfection. (If we drop a bit in one machine instruction, it becomes another instruction altogether.) As a background discussion of a large subject, W Douglas Maurer presents some information on How to Pick up a Dropped Bit using some of the techniques of error detection and correction.

What's a sure cure for memory megalomania? Why, Give Your Micro a Megabyte as outlined in Robert Grappel's short tutorial on some large memory design techniques which will prove adaptable to microcomputer systems. There should be virtually no reason to complain if his ideas were put into practice more universally.

An Introduction to Numbers, by Webb Simmons, serves as an introduction to the concepts of fixed, scaled and floating point numbers. Here you'll find some basic forms for each type, how the forms differ from each other, and how each can be used.

If you've ever been frustrated by the drudgery involved in relocating machine language programs with nothing but toggle switches, then Leor Zolman's A Machine Code Relocator for the 8080 is for you ! Just enter six key pieces of information and the program does the rest automatically, even fixing up all your address references.

For beginners first learning about computers, we often get requests for some basic information. In BASICally BASIC, Robert Baker gives an in formal introduction to the nature of the BASIC language and its uses in programming. Finding out what a typical BASIC can do is a good starting point in your personal evaluation of products available in the personal computing marketplace.

Given latitude and longitude of two points on the earth, how do you calculate the distance and bearing? If you use a little BASIC program by Rene Pittet, you can answer the question of How Far - Which Way? using a small processor.

If you have a Southwest Technical Products' TVT II, there is a simple circuit that you can add that will give you manual and computer control over the cursor's movement, erase and bell functions. In his article, Add Cursor Control to Your TVT II , Brother Thomas McGahee describes this simple circuit which can be attached to a TVT II.

Poor KIM . If one puts KIM-1 inside a fancy case, the built-in jewels of keyboard and displays get hidden . But Robert Grater comes to the rescue by Giving KIM Some Fancy Jewels, which consist of a remote set of displays connected to the processor by cable.