Vol.1 n°11 july 1976

Vol.1 n°11 july 1976

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

Foreground

p.6 COINCIDENT CURRENT FERRITE CORE MEMORIES

p.6 COINCIDENT CURRENT FERRITE CORE MEMORIES

[theme : Recycling] [author : Jones]

p.22 EXPLORE AN 8080 WITH EDUCATOR-8080

p.22 EXPLORE AN 8080 WITH EDUCATOR-8080

[theme : Software] [author : Howerton]

p.38 THE "IGNORANCE IS BLISS" TV DRIVE CIRCUIT

p.38 THE "IGNORANCE IS BLISS" TV DRIVE CIRCUIT

[theme : Hardware] [author : Barbier]

p.46 WHY WAIT? BUILD A FAST CASSETTE INTERFACE

p.46 WHY WAIT? BUILD A FAST CASSETTE INTERFACE

[theme : Hardware] [author : Suding]

Background

p.18 ASSEMBLING A SPHERE

p.18 ASSEMBLING A SPHERE

[theme : Review] [author : Anderson]

p.30 MACHINE LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING FOR THE "8008"-Chapter 1

p.30 MACHINE LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING FOR THE "8008"-Chapter 1

[theme : Software] [author : Wadsworth]

p.40 PUT THE "DO EVERYTHING" CHIP IN YOUR NEXT DESIGN

p.40 PUT THE "DO EVERYTHING" CHIP IN YOUR NEXT DESIGN

[theme : Hardware] [author : Baker]

p.54 SURPLUS ELECTRONICS IN TOKYO AND MANILA

p.54 SURPLUS ELECTRONICS IN TOKYO AND MANILA

[theme : Travelogue] [author : Hayes]

p.58 MAKE YOUR OWN PRINTED CIRCUITS

p.58 MAKE YOUR OWN PRINTED CIRCUITS

[theme : Hardware] [author : Hogenson]

p.64 A PLOT IS INCOMPLETE WITHOUT CHARACTERS

p.64 A PLOT IS INCOMPLETE WITHOUT CHARACTERS

[theme : Software] [author : Lerseth]

Nucleus

p.2 In This BYTE

p.2 In This BYTE

p.4 The Trend Toward Hassle Free Products

p.4 The Trend Toward Hassle Free Products

p.39 Tool Box

p.39 Tool Box

p.44, 79 BYTE's Bits

p.44, 79 BYTE's Bits

p.74 Good Grief!

p.74 Good Grief!

p.76, 102 What's New?

p.76, 102 What's New?

p.81 Software Bug of the Month 2

p.81 Software Bug of the Month 2

p.83 What Happened at Trenton

p.83 What Happened at Trenton

p.86 Clubs, Newsletters

p.86 Clubs, Newsletters

p.90 Letters

p.90 Letters

p.95 Ask BYTE

p.95 Ask BYTE

p.96 Reader's Service

p.96 Reader's Service

p.98 Classified Ads

p.98 Classified Ads

p.100 BYTE's Bugs

p.100 BYTE's Bugs

p.104 Book Reviews

p.104 Book Reviews

p.112 BOMB

p.112 BOMB

In this BYTE

Have you ever looked through the surplus catalogs and wondered whether those memory core planes and stacks advertised could be used for anything other than tea strainers? For theory and practical information on Coincident Current Ferrite Core Memories turn to James R Jones' article.

Bruce A Anderson describes his experiences Assembling a Sphere in his review of what rolled out of the production facilities in Bountiful UT last fall.

One of the most important questions people ask is "how do I learn about what a computer does? " One way to help out friends who are trying to get into the swing of things with programming is to implement a version of Charles Howerton's Educator-8080 program so that they can interactively Explore an 8080 with Educator-8080.

A thorough explanation of the instruction set should accompany any product intended for wide distribution. An example of such an explanation is provided by Nat Wadsworth's Machine Language Programming for the "8008" and Similar Microcomputers, a manual which is sold by Scelbi Computer Consulting Inc. In this issue is the first of three direct reprints from that manual: Chapter 1 which describes the 8008 instruction set.

One of the problems of interfacing unknown electronics is figuring out how to accomplish the match. Ken Barbier built a character generator, went out and bought a TV set, then faced the problem of building a driver for the TV. The result was The "Ignorance is Bliss" Television Drive Circuit.

While not really promising the entire big blue sky, when you Put the "Do Everything" Chip in your Next Design you'll end up with a computer that has five separate programmable real time clocks, standard serial communications data rates from 110 baud to 9600 baud, automatic generation of an 8080's RST n interrupt vectors, an 8 bit parallel output and an 8 bit parallel input port. Turn to Robert Baker's latest article to find out about this nifty chip.

Robert Suding asks "Why Wait?" in a rhetorical fashion, and proceeds to demonstrate his schematic of a fast cassette interface which uses software and a one bit 10 port to implement an audio cassette system.

What's it like to be isolated from bountiful US surplus markets? In a sense, it means a relative isolation from modern LSI products, as Dr Michael N Hayes reports on his experiences in Tokyo and Manila in December 1975. Read his report on Surplus Electronics in Tokyo and Manila in this issue.

There are many ways to wire a circuit. The most common manufacturing method is printed wiring. But you can also Make Your Own Printed Circuits at home, using techniques described by James Hogenson in his article.

One of the most interesting applications of computers is in the area of graphic outputs. Using a vector CRT or a plotter, drawing pictures of mathematically generated abstractions or simple cartoons can be the beginning of hours of fun. But A Plot Is Incomplete Without Characters so Richard J Lerseth concocted some software described in his article on the generation of an ASCII character set (or special characters) for a plotter or vector display device.