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Vol.10 n°1 january 1985

FEATURES

p.96 INTRODUCTION

p.98 CIARCIA'S CIRCUIT CELLAR: UNDERSTANDING LINEAR POWER SUPPLIES

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Proper design brings simplicity and reliability

p.113 THE VISUAL MIND AND THE MACINTOSH

[author Bill Benzon]

MacPaint provides a tool for thinking.

p.135 A GLIMPSE INTO FUTURE TELEVISION

[author Joseph S. Nadall]

How will high-definition television open the window on the world for users of personal computers?

p.155 MICROSOFT MACINTOSH BASIC VERSION 2.0

[author Gregg Williams]

This new version offers greater support of the Macintosh's distinctive features.

p.167 THE APPLE STORY, PART 2: MORE HISTORY AND THE APPLE III

[author Gregg Williams alld Rob Moore]

The interview with Steve Wozniak continues.

p.183 UNINTERRUPTIBLE POWER SUPPLIES

[author William Rynone]

These devices can save you from losing data in the dark.

p.197 AN INTRODUCTION TO FIBER OPTICS, PART 2: CONNECTIONS AND NETWORKS

[author Richard S. Shuford]

Optical fibers are becoming practical for use in applications such as local networks.

p.211 ALGORITHMS FOR A VARIABLE-PRECISION CALCULATOR

[author Paul A Nilson]

There's help for those who need to perform decimal computations on large numbers.

p.223 AUDIO-FREQUENCY ANALYZER

[author Vince Banes]

p.255 FONT DESIGN FOR PERSONAL WORKSTATIONS

[author Charles Bigelow]

Improved on-screen and printer fonts can help to make computers more acceptable as tools for a literate public.

p.275 EXPERT SYSTEMS-MYTH OR REALITY?

[author Bruce D'Ambrosio]

Artificial intelligence is considered by some to be one of the most important technologies on the horizon.

REVIEWS

p.286 INTRODUCTION

p.289 REVIEWER'S NOTEBOOK

[author Rich Malloy]

p.290 THE HP 110 PORTABLE COMPUTER

[author Mark Haas]

Hewlett-Packard's 8OC86-based lap-Size machine.

p.305 GIFFORD'S MP/M 8-16

[author Charles H. Strom]

A multiuser S-100--based operating system.

p.317 LOTUS'S SYMPHONY

[author Dick Pountain]

Another large, multipurpose spreadsheet program from the makers of 1-2-3.

p.329 MAGICPRINT

[author Alan R. Miller]

Enhanced print programs for CP/M and MSDOS systems.

p.337 THE HEWLETT-PACKARD THINKJET PRINTER

[author Mark Haas]

Ink-jet technology for HP, IBM, and Apple computers.

p.345 THE TI OMNI 800/MODEL 855 PRINTER

[author Mark Haas]

Multiple fonts via ROM cartridges.

p.353 REVIEW FEEDBACK

Readers respond to previous reviews.

KERNEL

p.361 INTRODUCTION

p.363 COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR: THE FAST LANE

[author Jerry Pournelle]

This month's whirlwind tour of the computing scene includes a look at Orchid's PCturbo 186, the MI-286 from Macrotech, and Ashton-late's dBASE III.

p.393 CHAOS MANOR MAIL

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Jerry's readers write, and he replies.

p.401 BYTE U.K.: THE AMSTRAD CPC 464

[author Dick Pountain]

This "home" computer has potential for business applications as well.

p.413 CIRCUIT CELLAR FEEDBACK

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Steve answers project-related queries from readers.

p.415 BYTE WEST COAST: LIGHT TOUCHES

[author John Markoff and Phillip Robinson]

The Mac goes to college, and mice and laser disks are in the news.

p.425 MATHEMATICAL RECREATIONS: THE FUNDAMENTAL COUNTING PRINCIPLE

[author Michael W. Ecker]

Dr. Ecker explores ways of counting without enumerating.

p.429 BYTE JAPAN: THE NEW AND THE OLD

[author William M. Raike]

Our Tokyo correspondent focuses on denser chips and software piracy in the East.

 

p.6 EDITORIAL: AUTONOMOUS WEAPONS AND HUMAN RESPONSIBILITY

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 LETTERS

p.33 FIXES AND UPDATES

p.39, 440 WHAT'S NEW

p.48 ASK BYTE

p.59 CLUBS & NEWSLETTERS

p.65 BOOK REVIEWS

p.83 EVENT QUEUE

p.435 BOOKS RECEIVED

p.493 UNCLASSIFIED ADS

p.494 BYTE's ONGOING MONITOR Box, BOMB RESULTS

p.495 READER SERVICE

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Vol.10 n°2 february 1985

FEATURES

p.98 THE HP INTEGRAL PERSONAL COMPUTER

[author Phillip Robinson]

Hewlett-Packard's new all-in-one system makes UNIX truly portable.

p.104 CIARCIA'S CIRCUIT CELLAR: BUILD A SERIAL EPROM PROGRAMMER

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Steve devises an affordable version of an essential tool for hackers.

p.120 THE MACINTOSH OFFICE

[author John Markoff and Phillip Robinson]

AppleIalk networks the Macintosh and its new laser printer.

p.138 C TO PASCAL

[author Ted Carnevale]

This program can make the conversion process less tedious.

p.147 SIMULATE A SERVO SYSTEM

[author Don Stauffer]

Model complex engineering problems on personal computers.

p.136 INTRODUCTION TO IMAGE PROCESSING

[author Jeffrey L. Star]

Manipulate images to make them more informative.

THEMES

p.174 INTRODUCTION

p.177 THE BIRTH OF A COMPUTER

[author John C. Nash]

In this interview, James H. Wilkinson discusses the building of a computer designed by Alan Turing.

p.199 A LOW-COST DATA-ACQUISITION SYSTEM

[author Kiyohisa Okamura and Kamyab Aghai-Tabriz]

A compromise between cost and quality, this system is adequate for many research projects.

p.207 FOURIER SMOOTHING WITHOUT THE FAST FOURIER TRANSFORM

[author Eric E. Aubanel and Keith B. Oldham]

The authors present an in-depth look at a technique for removing noise from your data.

p.223 PARANOIA: A FLOATING-POINT BENCHMARK

[author Richard Karpinski]

Test the quality of your software, not just its speed.

p.239 MODELING MASS-ACTION KINETICS

[author Alan Curtis]

In the future, microcomputers may have a substantial role in major scientific computations.

p.251 VIEWING MOLECULES WITH THE MACINTOSH

[author Earl J. Kirkland]

A BASIC program provides 3-D images of complex molecules.

p.263 LABORATORY INTERFACING

[author Lincoln E. Ford. M.D.]

A medical researcher examines the capabilities and limitations of an important laboratory device.

p.269 INTERFACING FOR DATA ACQUISITION

[author Thomas R. Clune]

Three interfaces are compared.

REVIEWS

p.286 INTRODUCTION

p.289 REVIEWER'S NOTEBOOK

[author Glenn Hartwig]

p.291 NEWWORD

[author John Heilborn and Nanci Reel]

A word processor from some of the creators of WordStar

p.295 JANUS/ADA

[author Mark J. Welch]

A nonstandard subset of Ada for MS-DOS and CP/M-80.

p.302 THE EPSON GENEVA PX-8

[author Rich Malloy]

It weighs five pounds and features a CMOS Z80 microprocessor.

p.311 TWO MODULA-2 COMPILERS FOR THE IBM PC

[author Kevin Bowyer]

Price is but one of the differences between these implementations.

p.317 E-MAIL FOR THE MASSES

[author Wayne Rash Jr.]

Comparing two electronic-mail services, MCI Mail and EasyLink.

p.325 MANNESMANN TALLY MT 160

[author Mark J. Welch]

A dot-matrix unit with a variety of print modes.

p.331 REVIEW FEEDBACK

Readers respond to previous reviews.

KERNEL

p.337 INTRODUCTION

p.339 COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR: TROUBLES

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Jerry's usual look at a variety of products includes a section on the proliferation of computer books.

p.359 CHAOS MANOR MAIL

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Jerry's readers write, and he replies.

p.367 BYTE JAPAN: DISKS AND PRINTERS

[author William M. Raike]

Our correspondent in Japan describes important new peripherals displayed at the 1984 Data Show.

p.371 BYTE WEST COAST: WHAT NEXT?

[author John Markoff, Phillip Robinson, and Ezra Shapiro]

Our West Coast editors report on Thunderscan, the ins and outs of windowing, new workstations, and more.

p.379 BYTE U.K.: REALIZING A DREAM

[author Dick Pountain]

The Whitechapel Computer Works MG-1 personal workstation is almost a dream computer - and it costs less than its competitors.

p.387 COMPUTERS AND LAW: COPYING MASS-MARKETED SOFTWARE

[author Robert Greene Sterne and Perry J. Saidman]

This column debuts with a look at two Lotus lawsuits settled out of court.

p.393 CIRCUIT CELLAR FEEDBACK

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Steve answers project-related queries from readers.

 

p.6 EDITORIAL: SERVICE AND SUPPORT

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 LETTERS

p.33 FIXES AND UPDATES

p.39, 421 WHAT'S NEW

p.48 ASK BYTE

p.59 CLUBS & NEWSLETTERS

p.65 BOOK REVIEWS

p.83 EVENT QUEUE

p.399 PROGRAMMING INSIGHT

p.409 BOOKS RECEIVED

p.477 UNCLASSIFIED ADS

p.478 BYTE's ONGOING MONITOR BOX, BOMB RESULTS

p.479 READER SERVICE

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Vol.10 n°3 march 1985

FEATURES

p.96 INTRODUCTION

p.98 ClARClA'S CIRCUIT CELLAR: BUILD THE TOUCH-TONE INTERACTIVE MESSAGE SYSTEM

[author Steve Ciarcia]

As a prelude to his major home-management/control system. Steve returns to the subject of DTMF decoding.

p.113 FACTFINDER

[author John Markoff]

The first text database for the Macintosh uses a window-based interface and a MacWrite-style editor.

p.119 ARITHMETIC ON YOUR PC

[author Peter Rice]

Overcome your PC's floating-point decimal limitation with this BASIC program.

p.129 BUILD A SERIAL CARD

[author Robert Kong Win Chang]

You can put together an inexpensive serial card for the Sanyo MBC 550.

p.130 TWO FLAT-DISPLAY TECHNOLOGIES

[author Richard S. Shuford]

Gas-plasma and electroluminescent displays may someday take the place of cathode-ray tubes.

p.141 NAVIGATION: PUTTING THE MICROCOMPUTER TO WORK AT SEA

[author Frederic N. Rounds]

The BASIC program described computes a ship's geographic position based on two successive sextant readings.

p.151 A UNIT-CONVERSION ALGORITHM

[author David L. Kahn]

This simple program is table-driven and can be extended to include almost any unit of measure

THEMES

p.168 INTRODUCTION

p.171 BUILD YOUR DREAM EDITOR

[author Steve McMahon]

The inexpensive programming editors discussed here are powerful and highly customizable.

p.183 THE COMMODORE 64 80-COWMN TERMINAL

[author John C. Field, Greg Richards, and Eric Beenfeldt]

If you've got an EPROM programmer handy, build this modification for the Commodore 64.

p.193 THE KIT SOLUTION

[author Laine Stump]

The 8-MHz, 16-bit Slicer is at the heart of a low-cost computer system.

p.207 PUBLIC-DOMAIN GEMS

[author John Markoff and Ezra Shapiro.]

Bulletin-board systems and independent distributors offer a wealth of free and nearly free software for the IBM PC and the Apple Macintosh.

p.221 AN XLISP TUTORIAL

[author David Belz]

This public-domain language lets you experiment with artificial intelligence.

p.240 BUDGET 3-D GRAPHICS

[author Tom Clune]

Three-dimensional plotting can be easy and inexpensive with the SURF program

REVIEWS

p.242 INTRODUCTION

p.245 REVIEWER'S NOTEBOOK

[author Glenn Hartwig]

p.247 THE ALTOS 586 WITH THE XENIX DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM

[author Greg Corson]

A low-cost, UNIX-based microcomputer.

p.256 THE NEC APC III

[author John D. Unger]

A business computer with high-resolution color graphics.

p.267 ATARI 800XL

[author Jon Edwards]

An old friend has a new look.

p.277 DAZZLE DRAW

[author Gregg Williams]

Paint with 16 colors on an Apple IIc or 128K-byte IIe

p.283 THE KOALAPAD

[author Donald R. Osgood]

One approach to making computers easy to use.

p.289 FRIENDLYWRITER AND FRIENDLVSPELLER

[author Steven D. Ryals]

Inexpensive but limited word processing.

p.299 TECMAR'S JRCAPTAIN

[author Glenn Hartwig]

A memory-expansion board for IBM's PCjr.

p.303 REVIEW FEEDBACK

Readers respond to previous reviews.

KERNEL

p.311 INTRODUCTION

p.313 COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR: ON THE ROAD: HACKERCON AND COMDEX

[author Jerry Pournelle]

In a jam-packed column, Jerry describes the highlights-including one of the most interesting parties he's attended-of these two meetings.

p.349 CHAOS MANOR MAIL

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Jerry's readers write, and he replies.

p.355 BYTE WEST COAST: UP TO DATE

[author John Markoff, Phillip Robinson, and Ezra Shapiro]

A first-of-its-kind convention for computer hackers is detailed, as well as the new Graphics Environment Manager called "GEM" from DR.

p.363 BYTE U.K.: MULTITASKING FORTH

[author Dick Pountain]

These multitasking systems, recently written in Great Britain, can be implemented on very small machines.

p.375 BYTE JAPAN: A SAMPLER

[author William M. Raike]

Bill looks at Turbo Pascal, IBM Japan's JX, WordStar 2000, and some other new products.

p.383 MATHEMATICAL RECREATIONS: MAGIC SQUARES

[author Robert T Kurosaka]

The method described here lets you easily construct any odd-order magic square.

p.390 CIRCUIT CELLAR FEEDBACK

[author Steve Garcia]

Steve answers project-related queries from readers

 

p.6 EDITORIAL: ANOTHER WORLD: THE 68000

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 LETTERS

p.33 FIXES AND UPDATES

p.39, 435 WHAT'S NEW

p.48 ASK BYTE

p.58 CLUBS & NEWSLETTERS

p.65 BOOK REVIEWS

p.83 EVENT QUEUE

p.396, 404 PROGRAMMING INSIGHTS

p.412 APPLICATION NOTE

p.418 BOOKS RECEIVED

p.493 UNCLASSIFIED ADS

p.494 BYTE's ONGOING MONITOR BOX, BOMB RESULTS

p.495 READER SERVICE

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Vol.10 n°4 april 1985

FEATURES

p.100 INTRODUCTION

p.102 CIARClA'S CiRCUIT CELLAR: BUILD THE HOME RUN CONTROL SYSTEM, PART I: INTRODUCTION

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Steve returns to the field of home control in this first part of a three-part series.

p.113 COPROCESSING IN MODULA-2

[author Colleen Roe Wilson]

This method lets you cooperatively process information by interleaved execution on a single computer.

p.120 A MILLION-POINT GRAPHICS TABLET

[author James Hawley]

Build a graphics pad for less than $200 using the KoalaPad for input.

THEMES

p.124 INTRODUCTION

p.126 COMMUNICATION WITH ALIEN INTELLIGENCE

[author Marvin Minsky]

It may not be as difficult as you would think

p.143 THE QUEST TO UNDERSTAND THINKING

[author Roger Schank and Larry Hunter]

It begins not with complex issues but with the most trivial of processes.

p.159 THE LISP TUTOR

[author John R. Anderson and Brian J. Reiser]

The system described offers many of the advantages of a human tutor in teaching LISP programming

p.179 PROUST

W Lewis Johnson and Elliot Soloway

This LISP program automatically debugs the efforts of novice Pascal programmers.

p.193 ARCHITECTURES FOR AI

[author Michael F. Deering]

The right combination of hardware and software is necessary for efficient processing.

p.209 THE LISP REVOLUTION

[author Patrick H. Winston]

The language is no longer limited to a lucky few.

p.223 THE CHALLENGE OF OPEN SYSTEMS

[author Carl Hewitt]

Current logic programming methods may be insufficient for developing the intelligent systems of the future.

p.245 VISION

[author Dana H. Ballard and Christopher M. Brown]

Technology is still being challenged to create reliable real-time vision systems.

p.265 LEARNING IN PARALLEL NETWORKS

[author Geoffrey E. Hinton]

The author presents two theories of how learning could occur in brain-like networks.

p.277 CONNECTIONS

[author Jerome A. Feldman]

Massively parallel computational models may simulate intelligent behavior more closely than models based on sequential machines.

p.286 REVERSE ENGINEERING THE BRAIN

[author John K. Stevens]

The brain's circuitry can serve as a model for silicon-based designs.

p.303 THE TECHNOLOGY OF EXPERT SYSTEMS

[author Robert H. Michaelsen, Donald Michie, and Albert Boulanger]

There's more than one way to ransplant expert knowledge to machines.

p.315 INSIDE AN EXPERT SYSTEM

[author Beverly A. Thompson and William A. Thompson]

The authors trace the development of a rule-based system from index cards to a Pascal program.

REVIEWS

p.334 INTRODUCTION

p.337 REVIEWER'S NOTEBOOK

[author Glenn Hartwig]

p.338 THE ITT XTRA

[author John D. Unger]

An IBM PC-compatible system with telecommunications software.

p.345 INSIGHT-A KNOWLEDGE SYSTEM

[author Bruce D'Ambrosio]

Software to help you build an expert system and learn about artificial intelligence.

p.348 REVIEW FEEDBACK

Readers respond to previous reviews

KERNEL

p.353 INTRODUCTION

p.355 COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR: OVER THE MOAT

[author Jerry Pournelle]

As construction workers descend on Chaos Manor. Jerry battles the flu to look at more new items.

p.373 CHAOS MANOR MAIL

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Jerry's readers write. and he replies.

p.379 BYTE WEST COAST: LASERS, OFFICE PUBLISHING, AND MORE

[author John Markoff and Phillip Robinson]

Our West Coast editors report on Interleaf's OPS-2000 and TP5-2000 and on FastFinder for the Macintosh.

p.389 BYTE U.K.: NEW DATABASE IDEAS

[author Dick Pountain]

I.D.E.A.S. is a commercial database-generator package in which all data items are related by a system of coordinates abstracted from the real world.

p.401 BYTE JAPAN: THE FIFTH GENERATION IN JAPAN

[author William M. Raike]

Our Japan correspondent takes note of the International Conference of Fifth Generation Computer Systems, the new Hitachi supercomputer, and software development in the country.

p.408 CIRCUIT CELLAR FEEDBACK

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Steve answers project-related queries from readers

 

p.6 EDITORIAL: GOLFERS AND HACKERS

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 LETTERS

p.33 FIXES AND UPDATES

p.39, 440 WHATS NEW

p.48 ASK BYTE

p.58 CLUBS & NEWSLETTERS

p.65 BOOK REVIEWS

p.83 EVENT QUEUE

p.96 WHATS NOT

p.414 BOOKS RECEIVED

p.429 PROGRAMMING INSIGHT

p.493 UNCLASSIFIED ADS

p.494 BYTE's ONGOING MONITOR Box, BOMB RESULTS

p.495 READER SERVICE

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Vol.10 n°5 may 1985

FEATURES

p.96 INTRODUCTION

p.98 THE AT&T UNIX PC

[author Gregg Williams]

AT&T integrates computer and telephone and civilizes UNIX for under $6000.

p.108 ClARCIA'S CIRCUIT CELLAR: BUILD THE HOME RUN CONTROL SYSTEM. PART 2: THE HARDWARE

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Steve gets into the nuts and bolts of his new control system.

p.128 SET EXTENSIONS WITH APPLE PASCAL

[author Alfred L. Schumer]

Expand your set capabilities with the SuperSets program.

p.143 BUILD A TALKING CLOCK SPEECH SYNTHESIZER

[author Ernest H. Piette]

Have your Commodore 64. VIC-20. or TRS-80 audibly announce the time

p.151 SMALLTALK COMES TO THE MICROCOMPUTER WORLD

[author Bruce Webster]

Three articles focus on this object-oriented language.

p.152 METHODS: A PRELIMINARY LOOK

[author Bruce Webster and Tom Yonkman]

Methods attempts to recreate the Smalltalk development environment on the IBM PC and compatibles.

p.155 SMALLTALK-PC

[author Christopher Made]

You can run Smalltalk on such systems as the Apple II and the IBM PC

p.160 THE SMALLTALK PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE

[author Jim Anderson and Barry Fishman]

This article presents a brief introduction to object-oriented programming.

THEMES

p.168 INTRODUCTION

p.171 MULTIPROCESSING: AN OVERVIEW

[author Rich Krajewski]

One word covers a variety of techniques for increasing computing speed.

p.185 EXTENDING MICROPROCESSOR ARCHITECTURES

[author Gary D. Beals]

Extended-processing units can significantly broaden instruction sets.

p.201 APPLYING DATA FLOW IN THE REAL WORLD

[author William Gerhard Paseman]

This model for parallel processing is finding its way into commercial applications.

p.219 THE TRANSPUTER

[author Paul Walker]

A small computer can serve as a building block for parallel processing.

p.239 DATA-MOVEMENT PRIMITIVES

[author J. Eric Roskos and Ching-Dong Hsieh]

The authors describe a low-cost, innovative technique for sharing memory

REVIEWS

p.256 INTRODUCTION

p.259 REVIEWER'S NOTEBOOK

[author Glenn Hartwig]

p.260 THE COMPAQ DESKPRO

[author Jerry Grady]

Four models offer "99.9 percent"- IBM PC compatibility.

p.270 IBM PC AT

[author Alan Finger]

This PC is geared toward business applications.

p.279 TRUE BASIC

[author G. Michael Vose]

BASIC's originators try to bring structure to the realm of "spaghetti code".

p.291 THE GTX-100 MODEM

[author Mark Haas]

Security functions are built into this smart device.

p.299 REVIEW FEEDBACK

Readers respond to previous reviews.

KERNEL

p.305 INTRODUCTION

p.307 COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR: IN SEARCH OF THE PERFECT PRODUCT

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Chaos Manor awards are handed out. and lerry discusses a new type of micro.

p.347 CHAOS MANOR MAIL

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Jerry"s readers write, and he replies.

p.355 BYTE JAPAN: MEGABITS AND GIGAFLOPS

[author William M. Raike]

This month Bill looks at IBM Japan's 1-megabit RAM chips and new personal computers from NEC and Fujitsu.

p.363 BYTE WEST COAST: HOMEBREW CHIPS

[author John Markoff, Phillip Robil1son, and Donna Osgood]

Our West Coast editors describe MOSIS and much more.

p.385 BYTE U.K.: PARALLEL PROCESSING

[author Dick Pountain]

From London, Dick introduces a machine called ALICE that uses parallel processors and executes a higher-order applicative language called Hope.

p.399 COMPUTERS AND LAW: THE SALE OF COMPUTER PRODUCTS

[author Robert Greene Sterne and Perry J. Saidman]

Two attorneys look at the legal aspects of buying and selling computers.

p.417 MATHEMATICAL RECREATIONS: AN EXERCISE IN BASIC BITWISE LOGIC OPERATION

[author Robert T. Kurosaka]

The ancient game of Nim helps teach the use of logical operators.

p.424 CIRCUIT CELLAR FEEDBACK

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Steve answers project-related queries from readers.

p.429 PROGRAMMING INSIGHT: 0.8660254 ≈ ...√3/2

[author Dan Sandberg]

This program lets you easily find the fractional equivalent of a decimal.

 

p.433 PROGRAMMING INSIGHT: COMPUTING PI

[author David J. Crawford]

Approximate the decimal value of irrational numbers.

 

p.6 EDITORIAL: BYTE's READER POLL

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 LETTERS

p.33 FIXES AND UPDATES

p.39, 464 WHATS NEW

p.48 ASK BYTE

p.58 CLUBS & NEWSLETTERS

p.65 BOOK REVIEWS

p.83 EVENT QUEUE

p.442 BOOKS RECEIVED

p.525 UNCLASSIFIED ADS

p.526 BYTE's ONGOING MOTITOR BOX, BOMB RESULTS

p.527 READER SERVICE

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Vol.10 n°6 june 1985

FEATURES

p.106 INTRODUCTION

p.108 INTERACTIVE AUDIO IN A VIDEODISC SYSTEM

[author John Lawler, Paul Hairsine, and Albert E. Miller.]

The tool described consists of a microcomputer. a touch-sensitive display, and an external audio box that's computer-controlled.

p.121 CIARCIA'S CIRCUIT CELLAR: BUILD THE HOME RUN CONTROL SYSTEM, PART 3: THE SOFTWARE

[author Steve Ciarcia]

In this final part of his home-control system, Steve describes the software and demonstrates a schedule entry.

p.147 SALT

[author Samuel D. Fenster and Lincoln E. Ford]

SALT is a reinvention of the threaded interpretive language in which assembly-language routines can be used in a single CALL statement from BASIC

p.169 THE SUM: AN AI COPROCESSOR

[author Phillip Robinson]

This coprocessor is intended for computers geared toward AI programming.

p.185 INSIDE APPLETALK

[author David Ushijima]

Apple's new local-area network is designed to let Apple and non-Apple products communicate and share information and resources.

p.205 THE EXPERT MECHANIC

[author Michael Fichtelman]

Expert systems needn't be esoteric or waste resources.

p.221 SWITCH

[author Werner F. Grunbaum]

Use color and monochrome monitors simultaneously on your IBM PC

p.228 TWO'S-COMPLEMENT NUMBERS REVISITED

[author Gary Bronson and Karl Lyon]

A value box helps simplify the conversion of positive numbers from binary to decimal form.

THEMES

p.232 INTRODUCTION

p.235 CHOOSING A PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE

[author Gary Elfring]

It's a three-step process.

p.243 STRUCTURING BASIC

[author Arthur Huston]

Compensate for some of the language's shortcomings with a library of subroutines.

p.253 SUBROUTINE LIBRARIES IN PASCAL

[author Bruce Webster]

The author presents a look at some of the facilities available for developing these libraries.

p.267 USING DATA FLOW FOR APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT

[author Wayne P. Stevens]

This form of linkage results in functions that are easier to understand, develop, and maintain.

p.279 DEBUGGING TECHNIQUES

[author Gregg Williams]

There are no magic formulas, but there are tools, and the most powerful one is your own brain.

p.295 6502 TRICKS AND TRAPS

[author Joe Holt]

A programmer offers tips for surviving 6502 assembly-language programming.

p.307 SOFTWARE-ICs

[author Lamar Ledbetter and Brad Cox]

Productivity Products International offers a plan for building reusable software components.

REVIEWS

p.320 INTRODUCTION

p.323 REVIEWER'S NOTEBOOK

[author Glenn Hartwig]

p.324 THE MINDSET PERSONAL COMPUTER

[author Tom Wadlow]

A machine that works like an IBM PC but adds CAD/CAM-inspired graphics capabilities.

p.337 IDEA PROCESSORS

[author William Hershey]

Four packages for organizing text and thoughts

p.353 CONVENIENCE SOFTWARE

[author Mark J. Welch]

A comparative review of pop-up programs.

p.371 BUILDING EXPERT SYSTEMS WITH M.1

[author Bruce D'Ambrosio]

A knowledge-engineering tool that's part software, part seminar.

p.379 HEWLETT-PACKARD'S HP 7475A PLOTTER

[author Rich Malloy]

A six-pen graphics machine

p.385 THE IBM QUIETWRITER PRINTER

[author Jon R. Edwards]

A letter-quality printer that uses thermal-transfer technology.

p.393 THE WORD PLUS

[author George Sheldon]

Software that checks your spelling.

p.401 REVIEW FEEDBACK

Readers respond to previous reviews.

KERNEL

p.406 INTRODUCTION

p.409 COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR: FROM THE LIVING ROOM

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Complete chaos at the Manor causes Jerry to escape to New York, but he still finds time to visit shows and look at new products.

p.435 CHAOS MANOR MAIL

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Jerry's readers write, and he replies.

p.439 BYTE U.K.: TELEPHONE COMPUTERS

[author Dick Pountain]

The One Per Desk is a personal computer with built-in telephone hardware, tightly integrated telecommunications software, and general-purpose desktop computer facilities.

p.451 BYTE JAPAN: NEW NECs AND A CARTRIDGE DISK

[author William M. Raike]

Our Japan reporter tells about three new microcomputers from NEC, a cartridge hard-disk system from Tomas Electronics, and Japan's use of public video-display units as shoppers' directories.

p.455 BYTE WEST COAST: A GEM SEMINAR

[author John Markoff and Phillip Robinson]

Our West Coast correspondents report on DR's seminar to teach programmers to adapt their software to the GEM environment, and on MacNosy and advances in disk-controller technology.

p.461 CIRCUIT CELLAR FEEDBACK

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Steve answers project-related queries from readers.

p.468 BYTELINES

[author Sol Libes]

 

p.6 EDITORIAL: THE BYTE INFORMATION EXCHANGE

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 LETTERS

p.33 FIXES AND UPDATES

p.39, 470 WHAT'S NEW

p.48 ASK BYTE

p.58 CLUBS & NEWSLETTERS

p.65 BOOK REVIEWS

p.86 EVENT QUEUE

p.465 BOOKS RECEIVED

p.525 UNCLASSIFIED ADS

p.526 BYTE'S ONGOING MONITOR BOX, BOMB RESULTS

p.527 READER SERVICE

byte_1985_07.jpg byte_1985_07_index.jpg byte_1985_07_index2.jpg

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Vol.10 n°7 july 1985

FEATURES

p.104 INTRODUCTION

p.106 PROGRAMMING PROJECT: NEW PERSPECTIVES ON NEARBY STARS

[author Bruce Webster]

This program, develooed on a Macintosh using MacAdvantage:UCSD Pascal, takes a list of stars and shows yuu where they are in respect to one another.

p.119 LIQUID-CRYSTAL DISPLAYS FOR PORTABLES

[author Glenn J. Adler]

The author presents an in-depth look into the workings of LCDs.

p.129 PRODUCT DESCRIPTION: THE GRIDCASE

[author Rich Malloy]

One member of this family of portables has a gas-plasma display.

p.141 CIARCIA'S CIRCUIT CELLAR: LIVING IN A SENSIBLE ENVIRONMENT

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Steve looks into his junk box for items to use with the Home Run Control System.

p.163 PROGRAMMING INSIGHT: TRAVESTY REVISITED

[author Murray Lesser]

Travesty is rewritten in compiled BASIC.

p.171 PROGRAMMING INSIGHT: REAL-NUMBER FORMATTING YOUR APPLE

[author Brent Daviduck]

Specify the decimal length of any real number.

THEMES

p.176 INTRODUCTION

p.179 UPDATING THE OLDEST SCIENCE

[author Russell M. Genet]

Observers around the globe are using microcomputers in a variety of astronomical applications.

p.192 MICROCOMPUTERS IN NASA's SIR-B

[author Richard Wilton]

The Shuttle Imaging Radar experiment employs a network of personal computers for data acquisition and analysis.

p.203 COMET LINES IN FORTRAN

[author David S. Dixon]

The program described calculates the positions of asteroids and comets.

p.215 TRACKING EARTH SATELLITES

[author E. H. Weiss]

The Stumpff program can help you calculate earth-orbiting satellite positions with high precision.

p.227 AUTOMATING A TELESCOPE

[author Louis J. Boyd]

A codirector of the Fairborn Observatory describes ways of computerizing the repetitious tasks in variable-star photometry.

p.239 ASTRONOMICAL COMPUTING WITH MICROS

[author Richard Bochonko and William T Peters]

Small systems increase the amateur astronomer's reach.

p.244 ASTRONOMY SOURCES

p.245 AN ASTRONOMY GLOSSARY

REVIEWS

p.248 INTRODUCTION

p.251 REVIEWER'S NOTEBOOK

[author Glenn Hartwig]

p.252 TEXAS INSTRUMENTS' PRO-LITE PROFESSIONAL COMPUTER

[author Richard Grehan and Eva White]

A briefcase-size machine that runs MS-DOS.

p.258 NCR PERSONAL COMPUTER MODEL 4

[author Elaine Holden]

An IBM PC-compatible with a RAM-disk utility.

p.265 MONITORING HALLEY'S COMET

[author John E. Mosley]

Three programs for tracking the return of the celestial visitor.

p.269 SPACE-FLIGHT SIMULATORS

[author Benjamin Bernar]

Link up with a space station or travel to Saturn.

p.279 MAXTHINK

[author William Hershey]

An outline processor for the IBM PC.

p.287 THE ANCHOR AUTOMATION SIGNALMAN MARK XII MODEM

[author George V. Kinal]

It's similar to the Hayes Smartmodem but not fully compatible.

p.295 REVIEW FEEDBACK

Readers respond to previous reviews.

KERNEL

p.306 INTRODUCTION

p.309 COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR: COME TO THE FAIRE

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Trips to shows and a visit with Niklaus Wirth highlight Jerry's month

p.338 CHAOS MANOR MAIL

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Jerry's readers write, and he replies.

p.341 BYTE WEST COAST: SNOBOL AND ICON

[author Ezra Shapiro]

Our West Coast staff interviewed one of SNOBOL4's authors. Ralph E. Griswold. who has gone on to create a new language called Icon.

p.353 BYTE U.K.: STARLIT SPECTRUM

[author Dick Pountain]

Dick reports on an astronomical application for the Sinclair Spectrum.

p.363 BYTE JAPAN: PERIPHERALS, CHIPS, AND NEW COMPUTERS

[author William M. Raike]

Bill looks at the Silver-Reed EB50, Fujitsu's new optical-disc coating material, and more.

p.367 ACCORDING TO WEBSTER: START-UP

[author Bruce Webster]

The debut of this column covers an assortment of Macintosh products.

p.385 MATHEMATICAL RECREATIONS: PARSING AND SOLVING LINEAR EQUATIONS

[author Robert T. Kurosaka]

Set up and solve simultaneous linear equations.

p.391 CIRCUIT CELLAR FEEDBACK

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Steve answers project-related queries from readers.

393 BYTELINES Sol Libes

News and speculation about personnal computers.

 

p.6 EDITORIAL: EQUAL ACCESS TO COMPUTERS SCRUPLES OR RUBLES ?

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 LETTERS

p.33 FIXES AND UPDATES

p.39, 406 WHAT'S NEW

p.48 ASK BYTE

p.58 CLUBS & NEWSLETTERS

p.65 BOOK REVIEWS

p.85 EVENT QUEUE

p.395 BOOKS RECEIVED

p.461 UNCLASSIFIED ADS

p.462 BYTE'S ONGOING MONITOR BOX, BOMB RESULTS

p.463 READER SERVICE

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Vol.10 n°8 august 1985

FEATURES

p.80 INTRODUCTION

p.83 THE AMIGA PERSONAL COMPUTER

[author Gregg Williams, Jon Edwards. and Phillip Robinson]

It has plenty of computing power and impressive color graphics.

p.104 CIARCIA'S CIRCUIT CELLAR: BUILD THE BASIC-52 COMPUTER/CONTROLLER

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Steve designs a cost-effective performance booster that can be used in serious applications.

p.120 THE DSI-32 COPROCESSOR BOARD, PART I: THE HARDWARE

[author Trevor G. Marshall, George Scolaro, David L. Rand, Tom King, and Vincent P. Williams]

When plugged into an IBM Pc, the DSI-32 is a complete National Semiconductor 32032 microcomputer with 256K bytes of memory.

p.138 PROGRAMMING PROJECT: CONTEXT-FREE PARSING OF ARITHMETIC EXPRESSIONS

[author Jonathan Amsterdam]

This program lets you parse integer arithmetic expressions into executable form.

THEMES

p.148 INTRODUCTION

p.151 PROLOG GOES TO WORK

[author Clara Y. Cuadrado and John L. Cuadrado]

What Prolog is, who's using it, and why.

p.161 LOGIC PROGRAMMING

[author Robert Kowalski]

It can be implemented as either a declarative programming language or a procedural programming language.

p.181 DECLARATIVE LANGUAGES: AN OVERVIEW

[author Susan Eisenbach and Chris Sadler]

Why we need another type of programming language.

p.201 PROGRAM TRANSFORMATION

[author John Darlington]

A researcher in functional languages explains a program-development methodology.

p.219 FUNCTIONAL PROGRAMMING USING FP

[author Peter G. Harrison and Hessam Khoshnevisan]

This language lets you program without objects by facilitating the manipulation of functions.

p.235 A HOPE TUTORIAL

[author Roger Bailey]

Learn how to use one of the new generation of functional languages.

REVIEWS

p.262 INTRODUCTION

p.265 REVIEWER'S NOTEBOOK

[author Glenn Hartwig]

p.266 THE TANDY 1000

[author Rich Malloy]

An inexpensive IBM PC-compatible system.

p.275 IBM PASCAL 2.00

[author Patrick J. Finan]

Improvements include better documentation and support of an 8087 coprocessor.

p.283 REVIEW FEEDBACK

Readers respond to previous reviews

KERNEL

p.290 INTRODUCTION

p.293 COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR: THE WEST COAST COMPUTER FAIRE

[author Jerry Pournelle]

A drive to San Francisco lets jerry see a multitude of new products

p.331 BYTE JAPAN: COMDEX IN JAPAN

[author William M. Raike]

Bill describes many of the new products that were featured at the first-ever COMDEX show in Japan.

p.341 BYTE U.K.: DECLARATIVE UPDATE

[author Dick Pountain]

Dick rounds out this month's "Declarative Languages" theme with reviews of two books and a look at two new language systems.

p.355 ACCORDING TO WEBSTER: GREETINGS AND AGITATIONS

[author Bruce Webster]

More Macintosh products are discussed this month.

p.369 BYTE WEST COAST: NEW MICROPROCESSOR CHIPS

[author Phillip Robinson]

Phil looks at Intel's iAPX 386, the 80C86, and Atron's "hardware-assisted" debugger for the 86 family.

p.376 CIRCUIT CELLAR FEEDBACK

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Steve answers project-related queries from readers.

p.378 BYTELINES

[author Sol Libes]

News and speculation about personal computers.

p.6 EDITORIAL: A VERY SPECIAL ISSUE

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 LETTERS

p.33 FIXES AND UPDATES

p.39, 380 WHAT'S NEW

p.49 BOOK REVIEWS

p.70 ASK BYTE

p.429 UNCLASSIFIED ADS

p.430 BYTE's ONGOING MONITOR BOX, BOMB RESULTS

p.431 READER SERVICE

byte_1985_09.jpg byte_1985_09_index.jpg byte_1985_09_index2.jpg

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Vol.10 n°9 september 1985

FEATURES

p.84 INTRODUCTION

p.86 CIARCIA'S CIRCUIT CELLAR: BUILD THE SB180 SINGLE-BOARD COMPUTER, PART I: THE HARDWARE

[author Steve Ciarcia]

The SB180 is the 29-chip equivalent of a large S-100 system.

p.104 PROGRAMMING PROJECT: AN ANALYSIS OF SORTS

[author Jonathan Amsterdam]

This article analyzes the efficiency of three sorting algorithms.

p.116 THE DSI-32 COPROCESSOR BOARD, PART 2: THE SOFTWARE

[author Trevor G. Marshall, George Scolaro, David L. Rand, Tom King, and Vincent P. Williams]

The software environment for the DSI board lets it run both UNIX and MS-DOS applications.

p.129 AN ALGORITHM FOR DISK CACHING WITH LIMITED MEMORY

[author Brian McKeon]

Several C routines execute an algorithm for efficient disk buffering in a limited memory space.

p.141 ASTROPHYSICAL NUMBER CRUNCHING

[author A. G. W. Cameron]

A Harvard astronomy professor reminisces about the various computers he's used since the fifties.

p.154 TWO GENERALIZED FLOATING-POINT REPRESENTATIONS

[author David Salomon]

Partitioned and variable-base representations are the two designs proposed here.

p.161 TURBO PASCAL DRIVES THE MOUSE

[author John Figueras]

The procedure described lets you use the Microsoft Mouse with Borland's Pascal.

p.171 IBM COMPATIBILITY FOR THE NEC APC III

[author Herbert Stein]

An operating-system patch and a few other alterations give the NEC APC III clone status.

p.183 PROGRAMMING INSIGHT: BUILD A TRAVESTY TREE

[author Peter Wayner]

A tree data structure speeds up travesty generation.

p.193 PROGRAMMING INSIGHT: PRINTING PASCAL GRAPHICS

[author Kelly W. Davis]

Dump Apple Pascal graphics to any Epson MX-series printer.

THEMES

p.226 INTRODUCTION

p.229 EGO: A HOMEBUILT CPU, PART I: THE SOFTWARE

[author Clifford Kelley]

The first in this two-part series covers the instruction set and software aspects of the EGO computer.

p.247 THE QUARTER-MEG ATARI 800XL

[author Claus Buchholz]

Upgrade your 8-bit microprocessor to 256K bytes and add a RAM disk.

p.257 A PARALLEL-TO-SERIAL PRINTER PORT ADAPTER

[author Howard Austerlitz]

With this $35 adapter you can use your parallei port for serial devices.

p.263 ADD FUNCTION KEYS TO YOUR MICROCOMPUTER

[author Mark Hanslip]

Expand your parallel keyboard.

REVIEWS

p.272 INTRODUCTION

p.275 REVIEWER'S NOTEBOOK

[author Glenn Hartwig]

p.276 THE KAYPRO 16

[author Sieve McManon]

A transportable IBM PC- and PC XT-compatible.

p.284 THE OSBORNE 3

[author Donna Osgood]

A 12-pound system based on the 80C86.

p.291 WORDSTAR 2000

[author Malcolm C. Rubel]

MicroPro makes changes to its classic.

p.297 XyWRITE II PLUS

[author Rubin Rabinovitz]

A word processor written by some of the designers of Atex, with macro routines and programming capability.

p.305 FILEVISION

[author Scott L. Norman]

Data management with an emphasis on graphics.

p.311 DB MASTER FOR THE MACINTOSH

[author Jeffrey M. Jacques]

Stoneware's database manager on another Apple.

p.321 PARADISE MODULAR GRAPHICS CARD

[author Harry Krause]

A graphics board for color and monochrome monitors.

p.325 THE RAMDISK-64

[author Warren Block]

Speed for the Commodore.

p.331 KEYPORT 717

[author David L. Salahi]

A programmable keyboard for the Apple II line.

p.335 REVIEW FEEDBACK

Readers respond to previous reviews.

KERNEL

p.344 INTRODUCTION

p.347 COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR: PCs, PERIPHERALS, PROGRAMS, AND PEOPLE

[author Jerry Pournelle]

A new spreadsheet for the Mac prompts Jerry to look at the concept of integrated software.

p.382 CHAOS MANOR MAIL

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Jerry's readers write, and he replies.

p.385 BYTE U.K.: SEVENTH ANNIVERSARY OF MICROCOMPUTING

[author Dick Pountain]

Our U.K. correspondent brings us a brief history of computing in Great Britain.

BYTE JAPAN: A HISTORY OF JAPAN'S MICROCOMPUTERS

[author William M. Raike]

Bill takes a look at the progress of microcomputing from his part of the world.

p.401 ACCORDING TO WEBSTER: WEST COAST FAIRE, MAC STUFF, AND THE AMIGA

[author Bruce Webster]

A trip to the West Coast Computer Faire highlights Bruce's month.

p.409 MATHEMATICAL RECREATIONS: π, e, AND ALL THAT

[author Robert T. Kurosaka]

This month's column looks at transcendental numbers.

p.416 CIRCUIT CELLAR FEEDBACK

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Steve answers project-related queries from readers.

p.418 BYTELINES

[author Sol Libes]

News and speculation about personal computers.

 

p.6 EDITORIAL: TEN GOOD YEARS

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 LETTERS

p.33 FIXES AND UPDATES

p.37, 431 WHATS NEW

p.44 ASK BYTE

p.54 CLUBS & NEWSLETTERS

p.57 BOOK REVIEWS

p.80 EVENT QUEUE

p.485 UNCLASSIFIED ADS

p.486 BYTE'S ONGOING MONITOR BOX, BOMB RESULTS

p.487 READER SERVICE

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Vol.10 n°10 october 1985

FEATURES

p.84 INTRODUCTION

p.86 CIARCIA'S CiRCUIT CELLAR: BUILD THE SB180 SINGLE-BOARD COMPUTER, PART 2: THE SOFTWARE

[author Steve Ciarcia]

The SB180 project concludes with a look at the Z-System operating system

p.101 EGO: A HOMEBUILT CPU, PART 2: THE HARDWARE

[author Clifford Kelley]

The conclusion of this series explains how the ECO's processor hardware decodes and executes instructions

p.112 PROGRAMMING PROJECT: BUILDING A COMPUTER IN SOFTWARE

[author Jonathan Amsterdam]

This project Involves designing a computer, a virtual machine, that is ideally suited to the high-level language you want to implement.

p.122 SKYCAM: AN AERIAL ROBOTIC CAMERA SYSTEM

[author Lawrence L. Cone]

An MC68000-based Stride controls the movement of this aerial camera

p.137 PROGRAMMING INSIGHT: SIMULATING THE NORMAL DISTRIBUTION

[author Arthur G. Hansen]

The author presents a BASIC routine for bell-curve sampling

p.143 PROGRAMMING INSIGHT: IBM PC JOYSTICK CONTROL USING TURBO PASCAL

[author James P McAdams]

This program will give you access to two joysticks and four push buttons via the IBM Came Control Adapter

THEMES

p.148 INTRODUCTION

p.151 WHY MODELS GO WRONG

[author Tom R. Houston]

You must take care in applying the principles of logic statistics, and measurement

p.167 THE PROBLEM OF OVERFITTING DATA

[author Wallace E. Larimore and Raman K. Mehra]

The mathematical model described balances the number of parameters and the degree of fit

p.183 TESTING LARGE-SCALE SIMULATIONS

[author Otis F Bryan Jr and Michael C. Natrella]

The authors discuss using a discrete simulation language to develop large programs

p.199 ANALYZING GOVERNMENT POLICIES

[author Ross M. Miller and Alexander S Kelso Jr]

A computer spreadsheet can help assess the impact of a major government policy decision

p.213 SIMULATING THE ARMS RACE

[author Michael D. Ward.]

In this model, military competition is based on weapons stockpiles

p.225 EPIAID

[author Andrew G. Dean]

This series of programs helps construct models of disease from real-world epidemics

p.239 PREDICTING ARSON

[author Royer Cook]

Micros become a new weapon in the fight against arson

p.249 FIGHTING FIRE WITH TECHNOLOGY

[author Bruce Dillenbeck]

The dBASE II database-management system goes to work in community-action service

REVIEWS

p.254 INTRODUCTION

p.257 REVIEWER'S NOTEBOOK

[author Glenn Hartwig]

p.258 THE ERICSSON PERSONAL COMPUTER

[author Jonn D. Unger]

An IBM PC-compatible highlighting ergonomic design

p.264 THE STEARNS DESKTOP COMPUTER

[author Wayne Rash Jr]

An 8-MHz IBM PC-compatible with optional 15-inch monitor

p.270 THE PORTABLE STM PERSONAL COMPUTER

[author R. Jeyaraman]

A 17-pounder with built-in modem, speaker phone and thermal printer

p.277 BETTERBASIC

[author Art Huston]

A compiled BASIC with access to a full 640K bytes

p.287 TLC-LISP

[author William G. Wong]

An implmentation for 8086/8088-based machines

p.295 GPSS/PC

[author Zaven A. Karian]

Software for simulating discrete events

p.305 THE TOSHIBA P1340 PRINTER

[author Rich Malloy]

A high-density dot-matrix machine

p.310 REVIEW FEEDBACK

Readers respond to previous reviews

KERNEL

p.312 INTRODUCTION

p.315 COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR: THE LORD OF THE MANOR MOVES UPSTAIRS

[author Jerry Pournelle]

The construction is finished, and he has a best-seller-all's right with Jerry's world

p.343 CHAOS MANOR MAIL

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Jerry's readers write, and he replies

p.347 ACCORDING TO WEBSTER: COMMODORE'S COUP

[author Bruce Webster]

Bruce takes a look at the Amiga and more Macintosh products

p.367 BYTE U.K.: COMPUTERS AS CONSULTANTS

[author Dick Pountain]

Dick introduces Tess and Expert-Ease, two expert-system shells from the UK

p.381 BYTE JAPAN: THE TOKYO MICROCOMPUTER SHOW

[author William M. Raike]

Bill reports on two new NEC personal computers, ASCII Corporation's 286 XENIX System V and several other products he saw at the show.

p.388 CIRCUIT CELLAR FEEDBACK

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Steve answers project-related queries from readers

 

p.6 EDITORIAL: BUILDING BIX WITH MICROS

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 LETTERS

p.33 FIXES AND UPDATES

p.37,395 WHATS NEW

p.44 ASK BYTE

p.54 CLUBS AND NEWSLETTERS

p.57 BOOK REVIEWS

p.80 EVENT QUEUE

p.453 UNCLASSIFIED ADS

p.454 BYTE'S ONGOING MONITOR BOX, BOMB RESULTS

p.455 READER SERVICE

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Vol.10 n°11 - Special IBM issue - Fall 1985 - Inside the IBM PCs

p.4 EDITORIAL: INTEL AND FUTURE IBM PCs

[author G. Michael Vose]

p.11 AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY OF RECENT BOOKS

[author Donald Evan Crabb]

p.39 PUBLIC-DOMAIN UTILITIES

[author Jon R. Edwards]

p.59 ROM BIOS EXTENSIONS FOR THE PC AT

[author Peter Norton]

p.66 THE 8087/80287 PERFORMANCE CURVE

[author Stephen R. Fried]

p.92 MOVING FROM THE 8088 TO THE 80286

[author William J. Claff]

p.105 WRITING DESK ACCESSORIES

[author Tom Wadlow]

p.127 A MIDI RECORDER

[author Donald Swearingen]

p.143 CIRCUIT DESIGN WITH LOTUS 1-2-3

[author John L. Haynes]

p.159 ADDING A HARD DISK TO YOUR PC AT

[author Jon Shiell and John Markoff]

p.167 FIXED DISKS AND THE PC AT

[author Jon Shiell and John Markoff]

p.177 A SURVEY OF DEBUGGERS

[author Frank Drake Jr., Arthur McCaffrey, and John Sadowsky]

p.187 IBM COMPATIBILITY ISSUES

[author Mark Dahmke]

p.195 BENCHMARKING THE CLONES

[author Jon R. Edwards and Glenn Hartwig]

p.203 FOUR HARD DISKS FOR UNDER $1000

[author Richard Grehan]

p.209 PROGRAMMING THE ENHANCED GRAPHICS ADAPTER

[author Richard Wilton]

p.223 IBM PC INTERRUPT SERVICE ROUTINES

[author Paul M. Dunphy]

p.231 PICK, COHERENT, AND THEOS

[author Marc J. Rochkind]

p.243 ONE MILLION PRIMES THROUGH THE SIEVE

[author T. A. Peng]

p.247 TOPVIEW

[author TJ Byers]

p.253 WHEN YOUR PC DOESN'T WORK

[author Gene B. Williams]

p.259 IBM PC FAMILY BIOS COMPARISON

[author Jon Shiell and John Markoff]

p.269 DEVICE-INDEPENDENT GRAPHICS

[author Thomas B. Clarkson III]

p.283 IBM PC DISK PERFORMANCE AND THE INTERLEAVE FACTOR

[author Marcus Kolod]

p.303 BYTE's ONGOING MONITOR BOX

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Vol.10 n°12 november 1985

FEATURES

p.86 INTRODUCTION

p.89 CIARCIA'S CIRCUIT CELLAR: THE WORLD'S SMALLEST 1200-BPS MODEM

[author Steve Ciarcia]

This flexible device has many applications, three of which Steve describes.

p.122 PROGRAMMING PROJECT: AN ASSEMBLER FOR VM2

[author Jonathan Amsterdam]

This assembler will let you write programs using instruction mnemonics and symbolic names for data.

p.123 PROGRAMMING PROJECT: EXTENDING TURBO PASCAL

[author Bruce Webster]

Bruce looks at five small libraries he created for Turbo Pascal under MS-DOS.

p.137 CD-ROMs AND THEIR KIN

[author Richard S. Shuford]

Optical storage devices, featuring storage capacities in the hundreds of megabytes, claim several advantages over traditional magnetic media.

p.151 HIGHS AND LOWS OF PARAMETER PASSING

[author Michael Kilian]

Interface low-level languages to high-level languages for more speed and flexibility.

161 PROGRAMMING INSIGHT: GAME-PADDLE CONTROL LINEARITY TEST

[author Marvin L. De long]

Use the game-paddle inputs on the Apple II to measure physical properties.

THEMES

p.169 THE AMIGA'S CUSTOM GRAPHICS CHIPS

[author Phillip Robinson]

BYTE interviews chip designer Jay Miner.

p.187 RASTER OPERATIONS

[author John Bennett]

BitBlt operations integrate text and graphics in high-performance systems.

p.207 MOVING PICTURES

[author Stefan Demetrescu]

The developer of the SLAM graphics chip discusses real-time graphics system design.

p.219 HIGH-RESOLUTION PRINTER GRAPHICS

[author Mark Bridger and Mark Goresky]

You can address the individual dots used to generate dot-matrix characters.

p.237 THE μPD7281 PROCESSOR

[author Tom Jeffery]

This non-von Neumann chip is designed for high-speed parallel processing of images.

REVIEWS

p.250 INTRODUCTION

p.253 REVIEWER'S NOTEBOOK

[author Glenn Hartwig]

p.254 THE DATA GENERAL/ONE

[author Wayne Rash Jr.]

An 11-pound portable computer with a liquid-crystal display.

p.266 SANYO MBC-775

[author Bruce Roberts]

A portable IBM PC-compatible with a built-in color monitor.

p.275 FIVE C COMPILERS FOR THE MACINTOSH

[author Tim Field]

Aztec C, Hippo-C, Mac C, Megamax C, and Softworks Macintosh C.

p.337 MAGIC/L

[author Michael W. Gilbert and Albert S. Woodhull]

Loki Engineering's FORTH descendant moves to 8-bit machines.

p.355 IBM's PROFESSIONAL GRAPHICS SYSTEM

[author Rik Jadrnicek]

A high-resolution color monitor paired with a graphics-controller board.

p.361 JUKI'S 6300 DAiSY-WHEEL PRINTER

[author Wayne Rash Jr.]

A letter-quality printer featuring Diablo compatibility.

p.367 REVIEW FEEDBACK

Readers respond to previous reviews.

KERNEL

p.370 INTRODUCTION

p.373 COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR: OLD FAVORITES AND NEW ONES

[author Jerry Pournelle]

The subject of computer conferencing finds Jerry discussing the old ARPANET and the new BIX.

p.399 CHAOS MANOR MAIL

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Jerry's readers write, and he replies.

p.401 ACCORDING TO WEBSTER: MEMORIES

[author Bruce Webster]

Because of a memory upgrade from Levco. Bruce begins to use his Macintosh for major word processing.

p.419 BYTE U.K.: LIVING C-PERSONAL

[author Dick Pountain]

Living C-Personal is a new product from the U.K. that offers an editor, interpreter, animator, and tracer/debugger all rolled into one menu-driven windowing environment.

p.433 MATHEMATICAL RECREATIONS: REPEATING DECIMALS

[author Robert T Kurosaka]

Learn some of their properties and a few possible uses.

BYTE JAPAN: COMPARING FUJITSUS

p.445 William M. Raike

Bill describes his latest computer purchase-the Fujitsu FM-16β.

p.450 CIRCUIT CELLAR FEEDBACK

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Steve answers project-related queries from readers.

 

p.6 EDITORIAL: A TALE OF FOUR COVERS

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 LETTERS

p.33 FIXES AND UPDATES

p.37, 452 WHAT'S NEW

p.44 ASK BYTE

p.54 CLUBS AND NEWSLElTERS

p.57 BOOK REVIEWS

p.82 EVENT QUEUE

p.509 UNCLASSIFIED ADS

p.510 BYTE's ONGOING MONITOR BOX, BOMB RESULTS

p.511 READER SERVICE

byte_1985_12.jpg byte_1985_12_index.jpg byte_1985_12_index2.jpg

Lire la revue / Get this issue (archive.org) lien externe

Vol.10 n°13 december 1985

Features

p.90 INTRODUCTION

p.93 CIARCIAS CIRCUIT CELLAR: TURNKEY BULLETIN-BOARD SYSTEM

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Steve combines the SB180 computer and Xecom's MOSART chip to produce a state-of-the-art system.

p.106 PROGRAMMING PROJECT A SIMPL COMPILER, PART 1 THE BASICS

[author Jonathan Amsterdam]

This is the fisrt of a three-part series on the construction of a compiler for a high-level language.

p.118 PRODUCT DESCRIPTION: THE TANDY 600 AND THE TANDY 3000

[author G. Michael Vose]

A production version of the 600, an 80C88-based laptop machine is examined, as well as a prototype of the 3000, a clone of IBM's PC AT.

p.125 ENGLISH RECOGNITION

[author Roy E. Kimbrell]

English gives you a variety of ways to express complex actions with a minimum of program interaction.

p.145 SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE

[author John C. Nash]

The author tells you to choose suitable scientific software.

p.155 PROGRAMMING INSIGHT: VIRTUAL FIELDING IN MICROSOFT BASIC

[author C. R. J. Currie]

Handle files with large record lenghts on Microsoft BASIC systems.

p.161 PROGRAMMING INSIGHT: TRAVESTY WITH DATABASE

[author Neil J. Rubenking]

This Turbo Pascal travesty generator stores frequency information in a database.

THEMES

p.166 INTRODUCTION

p.169 AN OVERVIEW OF CONFERENCING SYSTEMS

[author Brock N. Meeks]

The author presents a guided tour through COM, EIES, PARTI, NOTEPAD, and other systems.

p.187 CONFERENCING STANDARDS

[author Jacob Palme]

The search for a universal conferencing standard continues.

p.195 DATABASE STRUCTURE IN PORTACOM

[author Jacob Palme]

The discussion focuses on the functions that affect database structure in computer conferencing systems.

p.203 THE NETWORK APPLICATION MANAGER

[author Robert A. Flavin and Jack D. Williford]

You can put any application involving communications on a conferencing system.

p.221 STORAGE ARCHITECTURES

[author Alastair J. W. Mayer]

The author of CoSy discusses the implications of storage architecture.

p.239 COMMON GROUND

[author Chris Hancock]

The user-friendliness of this microcomputer-based conferencing system derives from its easy-to-visualize functions.

p.251 LOCAL POWER IN A REMOTE LINK

[author Chuck McManis]

Conferencing systems can let microcomputers handle much of the processing load.

p.263 CONVERSATIONS

[author Douglas E. Comer and Larry L. Peterson]

The authors dicuss an alternative to memos and conferences.

p.273 CROSS-SYSTEM CONFERENCING WITH CLACR

[author Sherwin M. Levinson]

Micros may offer a way to link systems and cut costs.

REVIEWS

p.290 INTRODUCTION

p.293 REVIEWER'S NOTEBOOK

[author Glenn Hartwig]

p.294 THE AT&T PC 6300

[author Bob Troiano]

IBM PC compatibility, an 8086-2 processor, and graphics capability.

p.306 THE TANDY 200 AND THE NEC PC-8401A

[author Harry Krause]

Comparing two under-$1000 laptop.

p.317 GOLDEN COMMON LISP

[author Bruce D'Ambrosio]

Gold Hill Computers' implementation for microcomputers.

p.323 THE NORTON UTILITIES

[author Rubin Rabinovitz]

Tools for recovering data and managing directories.

p.329 HYPERDRIVE FOR THE MACINTOSH

[author Gregg Williams]

An add-in hard-disk drive holding 10 or 20 megabytes.

p.335 UPGRADES FOR THE TRS-80 MODEL 100

[author Terry Kepner]

Equipment for expanding a portable.

p.343 THE IBM PROPRINTER

[author Rich Malloy]

A dot-matrix machine.

p.351 PANASONIC'S 4-COLOR GRAPHIC PENWRITER

[author Jon R. Edwards]

An electronic typewriter, a printer, and a graph maker combined.

p.359 REVIEW FEEDBACK

Readers respond to previous reviews.

KERNEL

p.360 INTRODUCTION

p.363 COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR: THE EUROPEAN CONNECTION

[author Jerry Pournelle]

p.383 CHAOS MANOR MAIL

[author Jerry Pournelle]

p.385 BYTE U.K.: THE TORCH TRIPLE X

[author Dick Pountain]

p.397 BYTE JAPAN: COMPUTING IN TAIWAN

[author William M. Raike]

p.405 ACCORDING TO WEBSTER: MICROCOMPUTER COLOR GRAPHICS-OBSERVATIONS

[author Bruce Webster]

p.420 CIRCUIT CELLAR FEEDBACK

[author Steve Ciarcia]

 

p.6 EDITORIAL: NEW SERVICES

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 LETTERS

p.33 FIXES AND UPDATES

p.37, 429 WHAT'S NEW

p.48 ASK BYTE

p.58 CLUBS AND NEWSLElTERS

p.65 BOOK REVIEWS

p.86 EVENT QUEUE

p.477 UNCLASSIFIED ADS

p.478 BYTE's ONGOING MONITOR BOX, BOMB RESULTS

p.479 READER SERVICE

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