Vol.13 n°5 may 1988

Vol.13 n°5 may 1988

p.2 Contents

p.65 PRODUCTS IN PERSPECTIVE

p.67 What's New

p.89 Short Takes

TurbosPort 386 Model 40, Zenith's new portable

Bridge-File, a safety net for the PS/2 user

ELM2 version 2.07, Fujitsu 's finite-element program

HP-19B and HP-28S, Hewlett-Packard 's calculators

WordPerfect for the Macintosh, with dozens of features

Optasm, a new IBM PC assembler

Think'n Time, a Macintosh desk accessory

REVIEWS

p.102 Product Focus: Word Processors for Desktop Publishing

Advanced packages can perform some desktop-publishing functions, but a gap still exists.

[author : Lamont Wood]

p.121 Upscaled Power in a Downscaled Box

The Amdek System/386 provides high-speed performance and a well-thought-out design.

[author : John Unger]

p.127 Dynamac's Portable Mac

The Dynamac EL: the first truly portable Macintosh.

[author : Peter Wayner]

p.134 Remaking a Classic

Apple's new series of Laser Writer IT printers: powerful, fast, and easy to upgrade.

[author : Curtis Franklin Jr.]

p.143 PCs and Macs Working Together

[author : Emil Flock]

QuickShare, DaynaFile, and MatchMaker bring harmony to a two-computer desktop.

p.153 Microsoft Windows 2.03 and Windows/386

An improvement in an old version and a new multitasking environment designed for 80386-based systems.

[author : Namir Clement Shammas]

p.157 Improved Command Processor

Get more versatility out of MS-DOS with Command Plus.

[author : Alex Lane]

p.160 So Many Options-So Little Room

Wendin-DOS promises a lot for $99.

[author : John McCormick and Jane Morrill Tazelaar]

p.171 Database Management via 1-2-3

Two new add-in products, Silverado and @BASE, add the capabilities of a good database manager to Lotus 1-2-3.

[author : Diana Gabaldon]

p.176 Byline

Desktop-publishing software for the PC that doesn't need extensive hardware.

[author : Diana Gabaldon]

p.180 A New-Wave Spreadsheet

NexView combines spreadsheet practicality and relational power.

[author : Keith Weiskamp]

COLUMNS

p.191 Computing at Chaos Manor: Shifting into High Gear

Realizing that 9600 bits per second is the wave of the future, Jerry switches to a USRobotics Courier HST modem.

[author : Jerry Pournelle]

p.207 Applications Only: Pin-Money Programs

A grab bag of inexpensive programs: Electronic Call Screening, The Worksheet Utilities, LaserSpeed, and Celebrity.

[author : Ezra Shapiro]

p.211 IN DEPTH: CPU Architectures

p.212 Introduction

p.213 The CPU Wars

An overview of the fundamental design decisions inherent in processor architectures.

[author : Pete Wilson]

p.239 What They Did Wrong

We conducted an informal poll on BIX to find out what peeves people about specific microprocessors.

[author : Richard Grehan and Jane Morrill Tazelaar]

p.253 Modeling Chaos

Such complex mathematical problems as fluid-flow simulations are tailor-made for parallel-architecture machines.

[author : Peter Wayner]

p.263 Real-World RISCs

Today's RISC microprocessors are pushing operational speeds beyond the capabilities of current system designs.

[author : Trevor Marshall]

p.273 FEATURES

p.275 Ciarcia's Circuit Cellar: The SmartSpooler Part 2: Software and Operation

SmartSpooler can function as a complete remote data-processing computer to analyze data.

[author : Steve Ciarcia]

p.285 POP Goes the Macintosh

POP-11, a powerful AI programming language, is finally available on a microcomputer.

[author : Dick Pountain]

p.297 Searching for Text? Send an N-Gram!

Short character strings called n-grams give every document a unique signature.

[author : Roy E. Kimbrell]

p.315 Juggling Multiple Processes

With Pascal-S, you can experiment with the fundamentals of concurrent programming.

[author : Gary Bricault]

DEPARTMENTS

p.6 Editorial: Graphics, DTP, and Price Wars

p.11 Micro bytes

p.22 Letters

p.32 Chaos Manor Mail

p.36 Ask BYTE

p.51 Book Reviews

p.362 Coming Up in BYTE

READER SERVICE

p.362 Editorial Index by Company

p.364 Alphabetical Index to Advertisers

p.366 Index to Advertisers by Product Category

Inquiry Reply Cards: after 368

PROGRAM LISTINGS

From BIX: see 294

From BYTEnet: call (617) 861-9764

On disk or in print: see card after 336