Vol.9 n°1 january 1984

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Columns

p.37 Build the Circuit Cellar Term-Mite ST Smart Terminal. Part 1: Hardware

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Thanks to advancing technology, you can construct an intelligent video terminal with just 21 integrated circuits.

p.53 BYTE West Coast: Beyond the Word Processor

[author Phil Lemmons]

Tomorrow's text editors may facilitate text composition from the earliest conceptual stages to the analysis of finished documents.

p.61 User's Column: Too Many Leads, or What In *;?|#"*? Goes First ?

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Jerry covers a lot of territory this month; beginning his journey of a tho us and words with a trip to the Circuit Cellar.

Themes

p.100 1984 and Beyond

[author G. Michael Vose]

The year calls up inevitable associations with George Orwell's novel of a futuristic, technologically oppressed society and raises questions concerning the presentand future significance of technology to our own culture.

p.104 Reason and the Software Bus

[author Michael F. Korns]

The Reason research project, exploring artificial intelligence, has developed a software bus that may have a significant effecton future software. As a hardware bus uses ICs, so the software bus manipulates various program components to provide integration, networking, and multitasking.

p.122 A General-Purpose Robot-Control Language

[author Dan Prendergast, Bill Slade, and Nelson Winkless]

By bridging the communication gap between people and robots, a plain-language system called Savvy increases the usefulness of these mechanical assistants.

p.134 1984, the Year of the 32-blt Microprocessor

[author Richard Mateosian]

As manufacturers rush to introduce their 32-bit designs, it's time to take a look at what these microprocessors are and what they're good for.

p.154 Memory Cards: A New Concept In Personal Computing

[author Mark Mills]

Picture a microcomputer without a keyboard, without a power supply, and small enough to fit in your wallet. That's just one possible application of memory-card technology.

p.172 Computer-aided Design

[author Rik Jadrnicek]

CAD capabilities on desktop systems can simplify a variety of tasks, from flowcharting to product design, but the choices in hardware and software can be baffling.

p.213 Speech Recognition: An Idea Whose Time Is Coming

[author George M. White]

While the multidisciplinary nature of the technology may slow its advance, speech recognition is well on its way to becoming a major factor in our interactions with machines.

p.226 Using Natural-Language Systemson Personal Computers

[author Jane Eisenberg and Jeffrey Hill]

Artificial intelligence offers possible solutions to the problems of communication between people and computers.

p.243 Portables - 1984 and Beyond: Idea-ProcessingSoftware and Portable Computers

[author David Winer and Peter Winer]

When your personal computer leaps off your desktop and into your briefcase, what type of software will accompany it?

p.251 Beyond the Application Program: A Different Approach to Integrated Software

[author John Banning]

Element managers that implement objects such as spreadsheet tables and paragraphs may supplant the traditional concept of the application program.

Reviews

p.267 Reviewer's Notebook

[author Rich Malloy]

This month's notes touch on Seequa Computer Corporation's Chameleon Plus and new trends in the printer market.

p.268 The Zenith Z-100

[author Ken Skier]

Supporting both 8-bit and 16-bit software, the Z-100 also offers impressive color graphics.

p.282 Pinball Construction Set

[author Elaine Holden]

Tired of the same old pinball games? Try creating your own with this software-design package.

p.288 The TRS-80 Model 16B with Xenix

[author Steve Barry and Randy Jacobson]

One of the most significant features of Radio Shack's new computer is its Unix-derived operating system.

p.324 Naturallink to Dow Jones News/Retrieval

[author Mark Haas]

A new software package from Texas Instruments simplifies access to a financial database.

p.339 The Vamp DVM-1 Computer/TV Interface Kit

[author Richard F. Gillette]

The picture quality of your display can suffer when you use a radio-frequency modulator to interface your computer's video output to a standard color television, but a kit from Vamp offers an alternative.

p.349 The Einstein Compiler

[author Peter Callamaras]

In addition to speeding up Applesoft BASIC programs, the Einstein compiler provides statistical information on the programs compiled and can function as a debugging tool.

p.354 The Basis 108

[author Seth P. Bates]

Apple compatibility is just one of this German import's interesting features.

Features

p.362 Bubbles on the S-100 Bus, Part 1: The Hardware

[author Louis Wheeler]

Using Intel's BPK 72 Bubble-Memory Prototype Kit, you can put together a 128K-byte bubble memory board for an S-100 bus system.

p.384 Mockingbird: A Composer's Amanuensis

[author John Turner Maxwell III and Severo M. Ornstein]

The chief purpose of this music notation editor from Xerox is to help composers capture their ideas by speeding up the notation process.

p.403 The VU68K Single-Board Computer

[author Edward M. Carter and A. B. Bonds]

You can construct a 68000-based system for under $200.

p.417 Translating the SAS Language Into BASIC

[author Jeff Bass]

A preprocessor program that translates SAS-like statements into equivalent BASIC statements permits SAS like programs to run on a microcomputer.

p.437 A Software Review Method That Really Works

[author Andrew Citron]

The group walk-through, a process of "playing computer," provides a workable means of correcting programming problems.

p.442 Real-Time Clocks and PC-DOS 2.0

[author David Broadwell]

A device-driver program for the clock Chip on a typical multifunction board takes advantage of special provisions in the IBM PC operating system.

Nucleus

p.4 Editorial: Revisiting the Luddites

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 Letters

p.451 BYTE's User to User

p.459 Ask BYTE

p.466 Software Received

p.471 Event Queue

p.476 Books Received

p.478 Clubs and Newsletters

p.480 What's New?

p.557 Unclassified Ads

p.558 BYTE's Ongoing Monitor Box, BOMB Results

p.559 Reader Service


Vol.9 n°2 february 1984

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Cover Story

p.30 The Apple Macintosh Computer

[author Gregg Williams]

The firm that brought forth the Lisa now offers mouse-window-desktop technology in an under-$2500 system.

p.58 An Interview: The Macintosh Design Team

[author Phil Lemmons]

The "wizards" behind the Macintosh discuss the design goals and philosophy that influenced the development of Apple's new computer.

Columns

p.88 Build the Circuit Cellar Term-Mite ST Smart Terminal, Part 2: Programming and Use

[author Steve Ciarcia]

The supplied standard control software supports several character attributes and various configuration options.

p.113 User's Column: Chaos Manor Gets Its long-Awaited IBM PC

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Of mice and men, Eagles, Shirley, the ol' mailbag, and much more.

p.147 BYTE West Coast: A Business Computer, a Business Program, and More on Voice Recognition

[author Ezra Shapiro]

Recent developments on the computing scene raise some questions about perceived industry trends.

Themes

p.158 Benchmarks and Performance Evaluation

[author Bruce Roberts]

This month's articles discuss benchmarks, their limitations, and alternative methods of product evaluation.

p.160 Don't Bench Me In

[author Jerry Houston]

Benchmarks are a popular way to compare both hardware and software. But how meaningful are they?

p.168 Beyond MIPS: Performance Is Not Quality

[author John M. Carroll and Mary Beth Rosson]

Two users observe that there's more to overall system quality than speed of operation.

p.175 Software Performance Evaluation

[author Brian Boyle]

This article presents some helpful guidelines borrowed from a successful hardware model.

p.193 The Art of Benchmarking Printers

[author Sergio Mello-Grand]

An exhaustive set of benchmarks helps you determine how fast your printer really is.

p.218 Benchmarking FORTRAN Compilers

[author Avram Tetewsky]

The author offers insights into determining which compiler creates the fastest code.

p.227 Benchmark Confessions

[author Peter Marvit and Mohandas Nair]

Understanding the background and intentions of benchmarks is the key to interpreting the results.

p.235 The Word-Processing Maze

[author Andrea Lewis]

How to find your way through all those "new" features.

p.243 Evaluating Word-Processing Programs

[author Arthur Naiman]

A 100-point checklist simplifies the decision-making process.

Reviews

p.251 Reviewer's Notebook

[author Rich Malloy]

A plotter from Hewlett-Packard, a Mannesmann Tally printer, and two software packages for the IBM PC are featured in this month's notes.

p.252 ProDOS

[author Rob Moore]

Apple computer presents a powerful new operating system for Apple II computers.

p.267 Knowledgeman

[author James W. Walker]

A new, fully integrated management system offers full database and spreadsheet capabilities in one package.

p.278 The IBM CS-9000 Lab Computer

[author Thomas R. Clune]

A closer look at IBM's "other" microcomputer.

p.292 The Rixon R212A Intelligent Modem

[author Chuck Weger]

This device can emulate the Hayes Smartmodem and do a few other tricks besides.

p.303 Savvy

[author Peter V. Caliamaras]

This easy-to-use system actually learns from you.

p.308 The Micro-Sci Gameport III for the Apple III

[author William J. Purpura and Paula K. Purpura]

With this card in place, your Apple III can run most Apple II game software.

p.310 The Videx Ultraterm

[author Peter V. Callamaras]

Easy to install and use, the Ultraterm video-display card enables the Apple II to display up to 160 columns or 48 lines.

p.318 Apple Disk Emulators: Axlon, Legend, Pion, and Synetix

[author Michael W. Gilbert]

Four RAM disk emulators for the Apple II allow faster execution times for applications requiring numerous disk accesses.

Features

p.84 Apple Announces the Lisa 2

[author Gregg Williams]

Macintosh compatibility is a key feature of the new Lisa.

p.331 IBM/Apple Communication

Robert Jones' Sending text files between Apples and IBM PCs is easy with these simple programs.

p.342 A Low-Cost, Low Write-Voltage EEPROM

[author Joe D. Blagg]

Seeq Technology's $10 EEPROM can be programmed in your computer with simple and inexpensive circuitry.

p.346 Foot Control

[author Dennis M. Pfister]

Adding a foot-operated Control key to your keyboard simplifies control sequences.

p.349 Inside a Complier: Notes on Optimization and Code Generation

[author Kaare Christian]

A look at Pascal/MT+86 and Pascal-86 show s you how to evaluate these and other compilers.

p.370 Writing Device Drivers for MS-DOS 2.0 Using Tandon TM100-4 Drives

[author J. Eric Roskos]

The increase in flexibility can be worth the added effort.

p.383 Deciphering Word Games

[author Mark C. Worley]

Two BASIC programs can help you solve cryptograms and anagrams.

p.388 Five Original Graphics

[author Robert Sussman and Ted Sussman]

Improving on the Spirograph.

p.395 Bubbles on the S-100 Bus, Part 2: The Software

[author Louis Wheeler]

Making Micropolis MDOS and CP/M work on a bubble-memory board.

p.416 Calculating Overhead Costs by Computer

[author G. Truman Hunter]

A simple, foolproof arithmetic procedure determines the distribution of indirect costs quickly and accurately

Nucleus

p.4 Editorial: The Compatibility Craze

p.7 MICROBYTES

p.12 Letters

p.428 Programming Quickie

p.436 Technical Forum

p.438 Ask BYTE

p.446 Software Received

p.457 Event Queue

p.466 Books Received

p.469 Clubs and Newsletters

p.472 BYTE 's User to User

p.478 Book Review

p.481 What's New?

p.541 Unclassified Ads

p.542 BYTE's Ongoing Monitor Box, BOMB Results

p.543 Reader Service


Vol.9 n°3 march 1984

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Columns

p.28 Build a Third-Generation Phonetic Speech Synthesizer

[author Steve Ciarcia]

The latest development in phonetic speech synthesis is the Silicon Systems SSI263 chip.

p.47 User's Column: New Machines, Networks, and Sundry Software

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Chaos Manor is inundated with new computers.

p.81 BYTE West Coast: A First Look at Dayflo

[author Ezra Shapiro]

A free-form database gets you closer to your ideas.

Themes

p.93 Feigning Reality

[author Art Little]

This month's theme articles explore the use of software models to solve real-world problems.

p.95 Computer Simulation: What It Is and How It's Done

[author Richard Bronson]

An introduction to modeling and computer simulation as they apply to microcomputers.

p.106 Simulating Reality with Computer Graphics

[author Peter R. Sørensen]

One of the most intriguing branches of computer science promises to get even more exciting in the future.

p.138 Simulation of Weighted Voting: The Banzhaf Index

[author Philip A. Schrodt]

In choosing and electing candidates, sometimes a small political party has the greatest influence.

p.157 Queue Simulation

[author E. Hart Rasmussen]

A microcomputer can help you manage waiting lines.

p.179 A Risky Business - An Introduction to Monte Carlo Venture Analysis

[author Pat Macaluso]

The author explains a simple method for analyzing business risks.

p.194 Simulation and Graphics on Microcomputers

[author Ronald R. Miller]

Some graphic examples may be worth a thousand words.

p.204 Going Further

[author Charles A. Pratt]

A compendium of conferences, organizations, books, and software for microcomputer simulationists.

Reviews

p.213 Reviewer's Notebook

[author Rich Malloy]

BYTE's product-review editor comments briefly on the Wang Professional Computer, DEC's Rainbow, and other systems.

p.214 Compupro's System 816/C and System 68K - the Two and Only

[author Ed Teja]

Compupro's new reversibles are 8085/8088 on one side and 68000 on the other.

p.224 Microsoft Flight Simulator

[author Stan Miastkowski]

Even experienced pilots should find this program useful and challenging.

p.236 The Eagle PC

[author Tom Wadlow]

A clone with a few improvements and a few mistakes.

p.246 STSC APL* Plus and IBM PC APL: Two APLs for the IBM PC

[author Jacques Bensimon]

The IBM version of APL is simpler and more conservatively designed; the STSC version is more powerful and more expensive.

p.268 Chalk Board's Powerpad and Leonardo's Library

[author Elaine Holden]

A new large touch panel for the Atari 400/800, the Commodore 64, and the Apple II comes with a wide selection of software.

p.274 Simulated Computer II

[author Richard Grehan]

A graphic demonstration of how a microprocessor operates is also an easy introduction to assembly language.

p.282 Bank Street Writer

[author Mario Pagnoni]

This word processor is simple enough for children but powerful enough for many adult writers.

p.288 SPOC: The Chess Master

[author Emil Flock and Jonathan Silverman]

A close look at a significant chess program for the IBM PC.

p.296 M.U.L.E.

[author Gene Smarte]

Beneath its clever packaging lies a fascinating economic simulation.

p.301 The Witness

[author Dennis Barker]

A murder-mystery game for detectives whose business is trouble.

Features

p.306 The Tandy TRS-80 Model 2000: A Powerful New MS-DOS Machine

[author Rich Malloy]

Performance advantages and an attractive price will make this 80186-based machine the new Tandy standard-bearer.

p.320 A Closer Look at the IBM PCjr

[author G. Michael Vose and Richard S. Shuford]

Two BYTE editors compare the PCjr to the PC and evaluate its performance and expandability

p.336 The Japan Shows: An Update on the Japanese Computing Scene

[author Richard Willis]

NEC introduces an impressive 16-bit computer, and Canon shows a remarkable, inexpensive laser printer.

p.352 The User Goes to COMDEX, 1983

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Sorting through a plethora of booths and products, Jerry manages to find some worthwhile merchandise.

p.371 Pascal's Design Flaws: Modula-2 Solutions and Pascal Patches

[author Mark C. Johnson and Allen Munro]

The authors look at seven subtle problems with Pascal and how Modula-2 avoids them.

p.393 Trademarking Software Packages

[author Robert Greene Sterne and Perry J. Saidman]

Trademark clearance can prevent litigation and loss of hard-earned goodwill.

p.400 An EPROM Simulator

[author Albert S. Woodhull]

This versatile project includes battery backup.

p.411 Simulation with Electronic Spreadsheets

[author Art Matheny]

Spreadsheet programs make a career change.

Nucleus

p.4 Editorial: Where BYTE Is Going

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.15 Letters

p.418 BYTE's User to User

p.430 Ask BYTE

p.438 Event Queue

p.458 Clubs and Newsletters

p.462 Software Received

p.470 Books Received

p.473 Book Reviews

p.474 What's New?

p.541 Unclassified

p.542 BYTE's Ongoing Monitor Box, BOMB Results

p.543 Reader Service


Vol.9 n°4 april 1984

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Columns

p.32 Build a Scrolling Alphanumeric LED Display

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Individual character arrays can be linked together to show lengthy messages.

p.57 User's Column: The Most Fabulous Object In the Entire World

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Ain't love grand, Diser, and lots more from Chaos Manor.

p.82 BYTE West Coast: Stylish Output

[author Ezra Shapiro]

Graphics terminals and a quiet inkjet printer are discussed.

Themes

p.93 The World of Micros

[author Gene Smarte]

This month's theme articles deal with theory, system descriptions, and projects touching on the capabilities and perils of real-world interfacing with microcomputers.

p.94 Personal Computer Signal Processing

[author Bill Engfemann and Mark Abraham]

An introduction to transducers, interfacing, and system development.

p.114 Planning a Computerized Measurement System

[author Craig R. Wyss]

The author offers tips on digital processing of analog signals.

p.127 Designing Systems for Real-Time Applications

[author James Isaak]

Some pointers to keep in mind before you tackle a real-time design.

p.137 Interfacing for Real-Time Control

[author Russell M. Genet, Louis J. Boyd, and Douglass J. Sauer]

Appropriate interfacing simplified the design of hardware and software in an observatory's telescope system.

p.152 Putting the Apple II Work, Part 1: The Hardware

[author Richard C. Hallgren]

How to create a high-speed system for the acquisition and analysis of data.

Reviews

p.169 Reviewer's Notebook

[author Rich Malloy]

BYTE's product-review editor comments on Panasonic's Sr. Partner, the ACT Apricot the Smart Cable, and this month's reviews.

p.170 The Rainbow 100

[author David B. Suits]

It runs CP/M-80, CP/M-86, and MS-DOS; but only on Rainbow-format disks.

p.186 Peachtext 5000

[author Stevanne Ruth Lehrman]

A collection of five business applications that are confederated - not integrated - into one package.

p.206 The Coleco Adam

[author Jules H. Gilder]

This inexpensive home computer includes all the necessary peripherals, but using it is no Garden of Eden.

p.224 Micro-logic

[author Richard Krajewski]

With this software you can design digital circuits with your Apple II or IBM PC.

p.234 Statistical Software for Microcomputers

[author James Carpenter, Dennis Deloria, and David Morganstein]

A comparative analysis of 24 packages.

Features

p.269 This Month's Features

[author G. Michael Vose]

Several new versions of BASIC are covered as well as the Mindset Personal Computer, Soviet microprocessors, and more.

p.270 The MIndset Personal Computer

[author Gregg Williams]

A promising graphics-oriented system that's partially compatible with the IBM PC.

p.298 Is BASIC Getting Better?

[author G. Michael Vose]

The language that made early microcomputers accessible is maturing to match the sophistication of a new generation of hardware.

p.300 True BASIC

[author Brig Elliott]

A company founded by BASIC's original authors announces a new version of the language.

p.302 BetterBASIC

[author G. Michael Vose]

One of the unique features of this BASIC variant is its modularity.

p.318 Macintosh BASIC

[author Scot Kamins]

Apple's new computer uses a semicompiled language with tools designed to simplify code writing.

p.334 Professional BASIC

[author Donald p.George]

Providing both support for the 8087 coprocessor and an array of debugging aids, this programming system makes BASIC a serious 16-bit tool.

p.344 BASIC-09

[author Brian Capouch]

A structured, incrementally compiled BASIC for Motorola MC6809-based microcomputers.

p.351 Soviet Microprocessors and Microcomputers

[author Ruth Heuertz]

A review of Soviet literature indicates that most microcomputers in the U.S.S.R. are based on older American microprocessors.

p.365 Toward Standardized VIdeo Terminals: ANSI X3.64 Device Control

[author Mark L. Siegel]

A set of codes that promises to alleviate incompatibility.

p.379 A VIC-20/Commodore 64 Terminal Emulator

[author John P. Russo]

This versatile program puts you in touch with mainframes.

p.422 Special April Supplement

A potpourri of features, including a preview of the Smart Blankie diurnal environmental control system.

Nucleus

p.4 Editorial: A Call for Ethical Standards for Personal Computer Magazines

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.15 Letters

p.392 Programming Quickie

p.398 BYTE's User to User

p.410 Ask BYTE

p.428, 432 Book Reviews

p.436 Clubs and Newsletters

p.442 Books Received

p.448 Software Received

p.465 Event Queue

p.479 What's New?

p.541 Unclassified Ads

p.542 BYTE's Ongoing Monitor Box, BOMB Results

p.543 Reader Service


Editorial

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A Call for Ethical Standards for Personal Computer Magazines

As a reader and a consumer, you have the right to know whether you can rely on the honesty and objectivity of articles in this and other personal computer magazines. Some common but unpublicized practices in this field raise serious ethical issues and can compromise a magazine's integrity. We want to inform you of these practices and to state our policies on them.

No "Editorial" Discounts for BYTE Staff Members

Some computer manufacturers and public relations agencies offer editors of personal computer magazines discounts of as much as 50 percent on both equipment and software. As a result, informed readers must wonder if a glowing article on a new computer was inspired by an honest evaluation or feelings of profound gratitude.

Discounts on hot new computers are a serious temptation for people who are as interested in computers as BYTE editors are, but we can't accept anything more valuable than a meal. We simply don't think that we or anyone else could remain objective after receiving such a favor.

Although staff members are not allowed to accept the loan of any equipment for their personal use, the magazine itself will accept long-term loans of single computers of each make in order to run software written for them. This policy applies equally to all manufacturers and is intended to help us extend coverage to more machines than we are able to buy. We return review machines unless the manufacturer offers to extend the loan to us, which seldom happens. To date, we have returned review disks of software, but the volume is now so enormous that we are considering keeping disks unless the publisher specifically requests return.

No Expense-Paid Trips

On occasion, BYTE receives invitations to send an editor on an expensepaid trip to a resort, a European capital, or some other almost irresistible setting for a "press conference." In principle, we can go on such a press excursion provided we pay our own way, all our competitors are going as well, and the trip has a legitimate journalistic purpose. But we don't believe that we can write objectively after flying free of charge to Paris or London and contemplating a new computer through a cloud of champagne bubbles. In practice, we just don't go on junkets, not even when told that all our competitors are going and that advertisements will be canceled if we don't go.

No Fat Speaker's Fees

BYTE staff members can't take money from advertisers or anyone likely to be the subject of coverage in BYTE. This applies to remuneration for speaking engagements. BYTE editors can accept paid transportation to the site of a speech but no fee for the speech beyond an honorarium of $50 or $100.

Disqualification from Stories because of Stock Ownership

No BYTE staff member can write about the products of any company in which he or she owns stock. For maximum journalistic freedom and objectivity, BYTE staff members should avoid owning stock in any company that is part of the industry we cover.

An Author's Connections Must Be Clear

Many of the people who are doing interesting things with computers work in the personal computer industry. We want such people to write nonpromotional articles for BYTE that shed light on some interesting aspect of technology, but we require that the authors' company affiliations be stated with the article. This policy sometimes prevents us from publishing an article that we like. A case in point: one author works for a major manufacturer of personal computers but is writing as an enthusiast about aspects of personal computing that are not involved in his job. The manufacturer forbids the employee to mention the company name unless the article is job-related. We can't publish the article without stating the company name. The author is caught in between, but we value this policy more than any single article.

No Favoritism to Advertisers in Editorial Coverage

We write about products when we think that our readers will find them interesting. Decisions about editorial coverage are made without regard to whether related advertisements have been or will be placed in BYTE. Once in a great while, an advertiser who is accustomed to standards different from BYTE's will demand so-called "editorial support" and say that some other publications provide it and we don't. This is particularly awkward when we are planning to cover the related product anyway; we don't want the advertiser to think that we have bowed to pressure and will allot coverage on demand.

Editors Determine the Editorial Themes

Some editors at other publications have told us that the advertising department or business office sometimes tells them to do, let's say, an issue on "peripherals." Such issue themes are evidently wonderful frameworks around which to assemble advertisements. The editors of BYTE determine the themes of its issues independently. Our issues on simulation, real-world interfacing, computers and the disabled, benchmarks, Smalltalk, and so on, may not relate as directly to some advertisers' products as salespeople like. These themes do, however, attract readers who are intensely interested in computers. From the business standpoint, the hope is that these readers will see and act on the advertisements; reader surveys seem to bear this out. From the editorial standpoint, we choose themes based on their inherent interest and their appeal to our readers.

No Privileged Relationships with Companies in the Field

Although we enjoy working with companies well in advance of product announcements, we are glad that BYTE's welfare doesn't depend on the cooperation or the success of any single company in the industry. We prize our independence, our objectivity, and our freedom to cover what we choose in the manner we choose.

This is not to begrudge any company or companies their success or to say that machine-specific publications are necessarily bad. Nevertheless, we enjoy being exempt from the whole set of ethical issues confronting magazines that cover a single computer or a single company's computers. We can state our opinions without wondering what The Only Company will think. We can point-out that The Only Machine has too little memory or a comparatively weak central processing unit or a power supply with hardly a milliampere to spare. Machine-specific magazines risk the loss of readers if they point out too many faults in The Only Machine. We serve our readers by pointing out all the faults we find.

The BYTE policies described above are nothing more than your due as a reader, and you may have believed that such policies go without saying at every magazine. But this is yet another area in which this young industry lacks standards. We pledge to do our best to safeguard our editorial integrity and to serve your interests as a personal computer user, and we call upon other magazines to do so as well.

-Phil Lemmons, Editor in Chief


Vol.9 n°5 may 1984

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Columns

p.40 Trump Card, Part 1: Hardware

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Speed up your IBM PC with 16-bit coprocessing power.

p.59 User's Column: Chaos Manor's Hard-Disk System

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Dirty filters, 8/16-land, views of the future, and inevitably more.

p.88 BYTE West Coast: Bulletin Boards in Space

[author John Markoff]

Amateur radio pioneering promises low-cost global communications.

Themes

p.98 Professional Computing

[author Stanley J. Wszola]

This month's theme articles explore how microcomputers can take on part of the burden of running many types of professional offices.

p.101 A Professional's Perspective on User-Friendliness

[author William J. Raduchel]

New systems are described as user-friendly, but what does that mean?

p.108 A Computer In the Doctor's Waiting Room

[author George Zucconi]

By handling patients' preliminary queries on a particular medical problem, the program described can save a doctor's time for answering more complicated questions.

p.122 The Microcomputer as a Decision-Making Aid

[author Peter Callamaras]

A computer can help you make work decisions, but only if you know what to expect.

p.127 Benchmarking Business-Modeling Software

[author William Hession and Malcolm Rubel]

The guidelines presented can help you compare the functions and speed of business-modeling software.

p.137 Expert Systems for Personal Computers

[author Milos Konopasek and Sundaresan Jayaraman]

The TK!Solver approach.

p.160 How Lawyers Can Use Microcomputers

[author Robert P. Wilkins]

Small systems can help cut costs while upgrading legal service.

p.171 Computerizing a Medical Office

[author Jonathan Javitt]

A physician's advice can be useful for other professionals needing tailored applications.

Reviews

p.187 Reviewer's Notebook

[author Rich Malloy]

BYTE's product-review editor comments briefly on Multiplan, PFS:Write, Infoscope, and more.

p.189 Thinktank

[author William R. Hershey]

Billed as an "idea processor," Thinktank is an outlining and organizing tool.

p.196 The QDP-300 Computer

[author Edward Joyce]

A high-priced but speedy Z80 system.

p.206 The Kaypro 10

[author Steve McMahon]

This hard-disk CP/M portable has a large software bundle and a small price.

p.225 Converting the TRS-80 Model III for CP/M

[author Mark E. Renne]

The author compares Mapper III, Shuffleboard III and Vid-80.

p.236 Robographics CAD-l

[author Rik Jadrnicek]

Convert an Apple computer into a drafting system.

p.246 Two More Versions of C for CP/M

[author David D. Clark]

A benchmark comparison of Q/C and Eco-C.

p.258 LNW-80

[author Mahlon G. Kelly]

A user reports favorably on this Z80-based, 8-bit TRS-80 work-alike.

Features

p.275 This Month's Features

[author G. Michael Vose]

BYTE's features editor gives an overview of the issue's feature articles.

p.276 The Apple IIc Personal Computer

[author John Markoff]

Apple introduces a portable IIe compatible that runs ProDOS.

p.288 Inside the Model 100's ROM

[author Brian Cameron]

Explore the built-in software of the TRS-80 Model 100.

p.307 Maximizing Hard-Disk Performance

[author Roy Chaney and Brian Johnson]

How cache memory can dramatically affect transfer rates.

p.339 Update on Apple Macintosh and Lisa 2

[author Gregg Williams]

The Macintosh turns out to be more expensive than expected.

p.340 Fitting Curves to Data

[author Marco S. Caceci and William P. Cacheris]

The Simplex algorithm is the answer.

p.366 Laboratory Data Collection with an IBM PC

[author Stephen C. Gates]

A versatile hardware/software combination.

p.382 Putting the Apple II Work, Part 2: The Software

[author Richard C. Hallgren]

A high-speed system for the acquisition and analysis of data.

p.400 ISIM: A Continuous-System Simulation Language

[author Roy E. Crosbie]

The structure and features of a simulation language designed to run under CP/M are discussed.

p.406 Indexing Open-Ended Tree Structures

[author John Snyder]

How to "walk" through a "grove" of A-trees in search of hierarchical nodes.

p.415 Using Comments to Aid Program Maintenance

[author Richard A. Thomas]

Complex software can be maintained more easily by the judicious use of remarks embedded in the program code.

Nucleus

p.4 Editorial: The BYTE Reader: Who You Are

p.9 MICRO BYTES

p.14 Letters

p.426 BYTE's User to User

p.444 Event Queue

p.468, 474 Book Reviews

p.478 Clubs and Newsletters

p.481 Books Received

p.488 Software Received

p.495 Ask BYTE

p.499 What's New?

p.573 Unclassified Ads

p.574 BYTE's Ongoing Monitor Box and BOMB Results

p.575 Reader Service


Vol.9 n°6 june 1984

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FEATURES

p.109 INTRODUCTION

p.111 THE HP 110

[author Ezra Shapiro]

This new battery-powered machine has 752K bytes of RAM and ROM and has built-in software including Lotus 1-2-3.

p.115 TRUMP CARD, PART 2: SOFTWARE

[author Steve Ciarcia]

The BASIC and C compilers for this Z8000 card boost the performance of the IBM PC.

p.127 FASTER FORTH

[author Ronald L. Greene]

Substituting a macro for the executable part of a word reduces overhead in subroutine-threaded languages.

p.131 AN ADA LANGUAGE PRIMER, PART 1

[author Sabina H. Saib]

An introduction to the language endorsed by the Department of Defense.

p.136 MACINTOSH PASCAL]

[author G. Michael Vose]

With the introduction of this version, Pascal becomes an interpreted language.

p.142 BUILD A PRINTER BUFFER

[author John Bono]

While waiting for your printer to finish your latest enormous listing, you can build a buffer that eliminates the wait.

p.146 APPLE FAX: WEATHER MAPS ON A VIDEO SCREEN

[author Keith H. Sueker]

This project lets your Apple display real-time weather maps on a high-resolution screen.

p.154 SPREADSHEET IN BASIC

[author Rodolfo Cerati]

This program permits more cells than some commercial spreadsheets and is written in Microsoft BASIC.

THEME: EDUCATION

p.161 INTRODUCTION

p.162 A COMPUTER ON EVERY DESK

[author Donna Osgood]

More and more universities in America are using personal computers as tools for education and communication.

p.187 PROGRAMMING BY REHEARSAL

[author William Finzer and Laura Gould]

Using the theatrical stage as a metaphor, this development environment makes it easier to write educational software.

p.215 GAME SETS AND BUILDERS

[author Ann Piestrup]

Two types of graphics-based educational software go beyond computer-aided instruction.

p.223 CAUTIONS ON COMPUTERS IN EDUCATION

[author Stephen L. Chorover]

A psychologist ponders the relationship between computer-based systems and human social systems.

p.233 LANGUAGES FOR STUDENTS

[author Fred A. Masterson]

Above all, languages must show simplicity, power, compatibility, and cognitive richness.

p.243 MICROCOMPUTERS IN THE FIELD

[author Robert P. Case]

An anthropologist describes the selection and "hardening" of a portable computer for use in field research.

p.255 KERMIT : A FILE-TRANSFER PROTOCOL FOR UNIVERSITIES, PART 1: DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS AND SPECIFICATIONS

[author Frank da Cruz and Bill Catchings]

Personal computers need to talk to minicomputers and mainframes in universities, and this protocol lets them do so.

p.279 SAN FRANCISCO'S EXPLORATORIUM

[author John Markoff]

A hands-on, interactive museum uses personal computers to teach science through experience.

p.287 DESIGNING A SIMULATED LABORATORY

[author Nils Peterson]

A personal computer simulates a classic experiment and teaches the concepts of cardiac function.

REVIEWS

p.301 REVIEWER'S NOTEBOOK

p.303 ANOTHER LOOK AT CP/M-80 C COMPILERS

[author Christopher Kern]

Whitesmiths, Q/C, and Supersoft Cs get a close examination.

p.321 ARCHON

[author Gregg Williams]

This game requires a sense of strategy and dexterity.

p.327 THE CHAMELEON PLUS

[author Rich Krajewski]

Compatible with the IBM PC, the Chameleon Plus merits serious consideration but does have some drawbacks.

p.341 THE TEXAS INSTRUMENTS SPEECH COMMAND SYSTEM

[author Mark Haas]

This voice input and output system for the TI Professional comes under the scrutiny of an experienced user.

p.353 VOLITION SYSTEMS' MODULA-2

[author Eric Eldred]

The author compares this version of Modula-2 for the Apple with familiar Apple Pascal.

p.367 INFOSCOPE

[author George Bond]

A RAM-based data-management system that exploits the IBM PC's color monitor wins the praise of an old hand at databases.

p.374 REVIEW FEEDBACK

Readers react to previous reviews.

KERNEL

p.385 INTRODUCTION

p.387 COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR: A SUPERBUSY MONTH

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Jerry celebrates a new hard disk, examines the Apple-Franklin decision, and romps through an assortment of new hardware and software.

p.400 CHAOS MANOR MAIL

Jerry's readers write, and he replies.

p.405 BYTE WEST COAST: LESSONS LEARNED

[author Ezra Shapiro]

SoftOffice's gestation was difficult, but this package provides icon-based integrated software at low overhead.

(Nucleus)

p.6 EDITORIAL: BYTE's NEW LOOK

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 LETTERS

p.38 UPDATE

p.50, 468 WHAT'S NEW

p.60 ASK BYTE

p.79 BOOK REVIEWS

p.91 CLUBS AND NEWSLETTERS

p.94 EVENT QUEUE

p.463 BOOKS RECEIVED

p.525 UNCLASSIFIED ADS

p.526 BYTE'S ONGOING MONITOR BOX, BOMB RESULTS

p.527 READER SERVICE


Vol.9 n°7 july 1984

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FEATURES

p.119 INTRODUCTION

p.121 SYMPHONY: A FULL-ORCHESTRA VERSION OF LOTUS 1-2-3

[author Rik Jadrnicek]

Word processing and communications add to the power of this integrated program.

p.125 CIARCIA'S CIRCUIT CELLAR: A MUSICAL TELEPHONE BELL

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Steve's latest project can help you personalize the sound of your telephone and, in the process, learn about the telephone system.

p.136 THE WEST COAST FAIRE

[author Jerry Pournelle]

The lord of the manor visits his favorite computer show.

p.139 AN ADA LANGUAGE PRIMER, PART 2: TOOL BUILDING IN ADA

[author Sabina H. Saib]

The primer concludes with an exploration of more advanced programming techniques and a look at Janus Ada for microcomputers

p.143 KERMIT: A FILE-TRANSFER PROJOCOL FOR UNIVERSITIES, PART 2: STATES AND TRANSITIONS, HEURISTIC RULES, AND EXAMPLES

[author Frank da Cruz and Bill Catchings]

This method works on both microcomputers and mainframes.

THEME: VIDEO

p.149 INTRODUCTION

p.151 ELECTRONIC ENCYCLOPEDIAS

[author Peter R. Cook]

Interactive video technologies help explore "the realm of worthwhile knowledge."

p.171 TELEVISIONS AS MONITORS

[author Ken Coach]

There's a new generation of TV receivers that double as computer displays.

p.179 COMPUTER CONTROL OF A VIDEO RECORDER

[author Cy Tymony]

You can extend the capabilities of your VCR with any sound-generating computer.

p.187 VIDEODISCS AND COMPUTERS

[author Stan Jarvis]

Hardware, formats, and interfacing are discussed.

p.207 CONTROLLING VIDEODISCS WITH MICROS

[author Rod Daynes and Steve Holder]

Tips on getting started and a generic BASIC program for the Sony SMC-70 are presented.

REVIEWS

p.233 REVIEWER'S NOTEBOOK

p.235 THE SAGE II AND SAGE IV COMPUTERS

[author Allen Munro]

Driven by the 32-/16-bit MC68000 chip, the Sage computers display the power of the p-System.

p.247 THE COMPAQ Plus

[author Mark Dahmke]

A key feature of this transportable computer is its shock-mounted, 10-megabyte fixed disk.

p.255 XENIX FOR THE IBM PC XT

[author Steven H. Barry and Randall Jacobson]

Sritek offers a 68000-based multiuser system.

p.267 TURBO PASCAL

[author Tom Wadlow]

Borland International's new Pascal compiler is available in CP/M and PC-DOS versions.

p.281 LISP FOR THE IBM PERSONAL COMPUTER

[author Jordan Bortz and John Diamant]

Integral Quality's IQLISP is compared with muLISP from The Soft Warehouse.

p.293 THE SMITH-CORONA L-1000 PRINTER

[author Richard S. Shuford]

This daisy-wheel unit is appropriate for light-duty word processing or high-quality program listings.

p.301 REVIEW FEEDBACK

Readers react to previous reviews.

KERNEL

p.303 INTRODUCTION

p.305 COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR: THE AT&T COMPUTERS

[author Jerry Pournelle]

The good doctor applauds the 3B2/300 and goes on to critique a plethora of products.

p.328 CHAOS MANOR MAIL

Jerry's readers write, and he replies.

p.341 BYTE WEST COAST: TRENDS IN TELECOMMUNICATIONS

[author John Markoff]

On-line search software and faster modems help personal computer users access specialized information on large databases.

p.361 BYTE JAPAN: START-UP

[author William Raike]

BYTE's Tokyo correspondent reports on Seiko's wrist computer, the Akihabara district, and other news from across the Pacific.

p.365 MATHEMATICAL RECREATIONS: INVARIANCE

[author Michael W. Ecker]

Several number tricks are based on this principle.

(Nucleus)

p.6 EDITORIAL: PATRONIZING THE NAIVE USER

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 LETTERS

p.33 UPDATE

p.44, 410 WHAT'S NEW

p.54 ASK BYTE

p.69 CLUBS AND NEWSLETTERS

p.73 BOOK REVIEWS

p.94 EVENT QUEUE

p.112 BYTE'S BUGS

p.114 BYTE'S BITS

p.406 BOOKS RECEIVED

p.461 UNCLASSIFIED ADS

p.462 BYTE'S ONGOING MONITOR BOX, BOMB RESULTS

p.463 READER SERVICE


Vol.9 n°8 august 1984

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FEATURES

p.119 INTRODUCTION

p.121 FRAMEWORK

[author Rik Jadrnicek, John Markoff, and Ezra Shapiro]

A team of BYTE editors previews an integrated software package that combines familiar features within a novel structure.

p.125 THE 65816 MICROPROCESSOR, PART 1: SOFTWARE

[author Steven P. Hendrix]

This two-part series begins with a look at software considerations for an 8-/16-bit successor to the 6502.

p.129 CIARCIA'S CIRCUIT CELLAR : CIRCUIT CELLAR FEEDBACK

[author Steve Clarcia]

Steve takes a break from hardware design to answer project-related queries from readers.

p.132 BENCHMARKING UNIX SYSTEMS

[author David F. Hinnant]

Several microcomputer UNIX implementations are compared to minicomputer versions of the operating system.

p.137 FORTH-83: EVOLUTION CONTINUES

[author C. Kevin McCabe]

A new standard corrects some problems, but FORTH is still a language in flux.

THEME: MODULA-2

p.143 INTRODUCTION

p.145 HISTORY AND GOALS OF MODULA-2

[author Niklaus Wirth]

The creator of Pascal and Modula-2 writes on the module's coming of age.

p.157 TUTORIAL ON MODULA-2

[author Jurg Gutknecht]

The concept of autonomous modules is fundamental to this structured programming language.

p.181 LILITH AND MODULA-2

[author Richard Ohran]

The director of the Modula Research Institute offers a case study of high-level-language processor design.

p.195 AN INTRODUCTION TO MODULA-2

[author Robert J. Paul]

An exploration of the differences in control structure, expressions, and general syntax between Modula-2 and Pascal puts the new language in perspective.

p.215 PASCAL, ADA, AND MODULA-2

[author David Coar]

A system programmer compares the three languages.

REVIEWS

p.237 REVIEWER'S NOTEBOOK

p.238 THE MACINTOSH

[author Bruce F. Webster]

Apple's new system, while not perfect, comes a long way toward achieving its design goals of being nonthreatening, quickly learned, easy to use, and fun.

p.254 THE IBM PCJR

[author Rowland Archer Jr]

First impressions are favorable, but a closer look reveals some problems.

p.270 THE SANYO MBC-550

[author Bill Sudbrink]

This inexpensive MS-DOS system is IBM compatible.

p.287 FOUR LOGOS FOR THE IBM PC

[author Mark Bridger]

Several new Logo packages offer turtle graphics of varying quality on the IBM Personal Computer.

p.305 THE JUKI 6100 PRINTER

[author G. Michael Vose]

Juki Industries' fully formed character printer isn't fast, but it's inexpensive.

p.308 REVIEW FEEDBACK

Readers respond to previous reviews.

KERNEL

p.311 INTRODUCTION

p.313 COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR : BETWEEN CONVENTIONS

[author Jerry Pournelle]

In a hectic schedule, Jerry finds time for a Mac attack and more colorful commentary on the computing scene.

p.334 CHAOS MANOR MAIL

Jerry's readers write, and he replies.

p.339 BYTE JAPAN: PASOCOM PAGODAS

[author William M. Raike]

Our man in Tokyo comments on a software shortage, the Sharp MZ-5500, the Fujitsu FM-11, and more.

p.347 BYTE WEST COAST: MACINTOSH'S OTHER DESIGNERS

[author John Markoff and Ezra Shapiro]

Three original designers discuss the earliest days.

p.361 BYTE U.K.: MICROPROCESSOR DESIGN

[author Dick Pountain]

BYTE's British correspondent looks at the Transputer and its special language. Occam.

(Nucleus)

p.6 EDITORIAL WHAT MAKES PERSONAL COMPUTERS SPECIAL?

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 LETTERS

p.33 FIXES AND UPDATES

p.44, 431 WHAT'S NEW

p.54 ASK BYTE

p.67 CLUBS AND NEWSLETTERS

p.73 BOOK REVIEWS

p.94 EVENT QUEUE

p.424 BOOKS RECEIVED

p.428 TECHNICAL FORUM

p.477 UNCLASSIFIED ADS

p.478 BYTE's ONGOING MONITOR Box. BOMB RESULTS

p.479 READER SERVICE


Vol.9 n°9 - Special IBM issue - Fall 1984

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p.1 IBM AND ITS PCs

[author Phil Lemmons]

INTRODUCTION

p.9 THE ARRAY OF IBM PERSONAL COMPUTERS

• Matching Machines to Computing Requirements

p.10 IBM PERSONAL COMPUTERS AT A GLANCE

The Pc, PC XT, Jr, Portable, XT/370, 3270 Pc, and S9000.

p.30 FORECAST: MARKET DOMINANCE

[author Michael Killen]

A wide range of IBM products followed the PC's well-timed market entry.

STALWARTS

p.41 OPERATING SYSTEMS, PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES, AND ApPLICATIONS

• Machines Within the Machines: Operating Systems

p.42 A TALE OF TWO OPERATING SYSTEMS

[author Charles Daney and Tom Foth]

The virtual machine of the XT/370 at work with PC-DOS.

p.59 THE FUTURE OF UNIX ON THE IBM PC

[author Ralpn A Phraner]

UNIX is running on the PC XT, but how soon will it be available?

p.65 FIVE WINDOW MANAGERS FOR THE IBM PC

[author Jonn Markoff]

You may be ready for window-management software, but is it ready for you?

• Manners of Speaking: Programming Languages

p.91 TWO LOGOS FOR THE IBM PC

[author Morton Goldberg]

IBM's Logo compared with a version from Digital Research

p.125 THE LOGICAL RECORD KEEPER: PROLOG ON THE IBM

[author James L. Weiner]

PROLOG uses the techniques of a database manager in a programming language.

p.134 AN INTRODUCTION TO PC ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING

[author William J. Claff]

High-level languages are easier to learn if you understand assembly language

• Ways of Working: Applications and Programming

p.155 TECHNICAL AND BUSINESS GRAPHICS ON THE IBM PC

[author Jack Bishop]

Spreadsheet packages can improve the looks of any business presentation

p.165 WORD PROCESSING REVISITED

[author Janet Cameron]

A review of five new versions of popular word processors for the IBM Pc.

p.187 SIX DATABASE-MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS FOR THE IBM PC

[author David Kruglinski]

Six popular databases have been updated on the IBM Pc.

p.197 EVALUATING 8087 PERFORMANCE ON THE IBM PC

[author Stepnen S. Fried]

The 8087 coprocessor for your IBM can save you time and money.

EXTRA POWER FOR SPECIAL NEEDS

p.209 IBM's XT/370, 3270 PC, AND S9000

• The-Micro as Mainframe / The Mainframe as Micro

p.210 THE IBM XT/370 PERSONAL COMPUTER

[author Ernest Sabine]

IBM has put a virtual machine on everyone's desk.

p.218 NUMBER CRUNCHING ON IBM's NEW S9000

[author David J. States]

The S9000, from IBM's instrument division, may be the first micro for the scientist.

p.231 THE MAINFRAME CONNECTION: IBM's 3270 PC

[author Larry Augustin]

Faster communications and windows make the 3270 a bridge to IBM's mainframes.

• Maximizing the PC Family: Communications and Compatibility

p.238 MODEMS: THE NEXT GENERATION

[author Mark Klein]

Smart interfaces and new software are making modems easier to use.

p.248 MOVING DATA BETWEEN PCs AND MAINFRAMES

[author Jay Siegel]

Moving data between computers and terminal software can be a problem.

p.256 TESTING FOR IBM PC COMPATIBILITY

[author Robert A. Stillman]

Trying to stretch your PC budget may mean searching for a compatible machine.

p.266 WHAT'S NEW

BYTE looks at some of the latest products to boost the productivity of your Pc.


Vol.9 n°10 september 1984

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FEATURES

p.105 INTRODUCTION

p.107 CIARCIAS CIRCUIT CELLAR : BUILD THE AC POWER MONITOR

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Your computer can measure electrical power consumption.

p.123 KAMAS: AN UNLIKELY COMBINATION

[author Ezra Shapiro]

This product preview covers a software package offering outline processing and a FORTH-like language for Z80 systems.

p.129 CLUSTER ANALYSIS

[author Rob Spencer]

A BASIC program illustrates this pattern-recognition technique.

p.135 THE 65816 MICROPROCESSOR, PART 2: HARDWARE

[author Steven P Hendrix]

The concluding article of this series deals with system-design considerations.

p.141 THE FLOPPY DISK

[author Glenn Hartwig]

A trio of articles focuses on this often-overlooked component.

p.142 COMPARING FLOPPY DISKS

[author Robert Rodina]

A software consultant offers a subjective evaluation of several brands of disks.

p.145 THE THEORY OF DISK-ERROR CORRECTION

[author Thomas Sterling]

The algorithms presented can help you recover data from "unreadable" disk sectors.

p.147 FLOPPY-DISK FORMATS

[author Lester E. Thompson]

The author attempts to dispel some of the mystery surrounding incompatibility and standardization.

p.150 BIG PROJECTS ON SMALL MACHINES

[author William F. Appelbe and Alex Pournelle]

Project management and organization are the keys to the successful development of large software projects.

THEME: GRAPHICS

p.155 INTRODUCTION

p.157 FRACTALS

[author Peter R. Sorensen]

In the unexplored territory of fractional dimensions, mathematical pioneers are making intriguing discoveries.

p.177 LASER GRAPHICS AND ANIMATION

[author Joan Collins and Doug Tucker]

A microprocessor can program some sophisticated light effects.

p.189 THE COMPUTER AS AN ARTISTIC TOOL

[author Isaac Victor Kerlow]

The imaging process doesn't change, only the medium does.

p.211 COMPUTER LANDSCAPES

[author Daniel Cooper]

Computer graphics merge with silk-screen printing.

p.221 EDITOR'S CHOICE

[author Jane Morrill Tazelaar]

Various graphics techniques are illustrated in this selection of computer-generated art.

p.227 COLOR CONSIDERATIONS

[author Lee Baldwin]

The author explores the use of color as an emotive and persuasive psychological force.

p.251 REAL-TIME 3-D GRAPHICS FOR MICROCOMPUTERS

[author Marcus Newton]

A simplified drawing algorithm coded in assembly language permits 3-D animation in real time.

p.289 FROM PIXELS TO MICRODOTS

[author Jane Morrill Tazelaar]

New developments in image resolution increase microcomputer graphics potential.

REVIEWS

p.297 INTRODUCTION

p.299 REVIEWER'S NOTEBOOK

[author Rich Malloy]

BYTE's product-review editor comments on the Geneva PX-8 briefcase unit, the Telecomp 1000, and more.

p.300 THE LILITH PERSONAL COMPUTER

[author Paul A. Sand]

High performance results from a computer architecture built around Modula-2.

p.312 THE LEADING EDGE PERSONAL COMPUTER

[author Jeffrey Mazur]

This desktop system has an impressive word-processing program.

p.325 THE MORROW MD-11

[author John Heilborn]

A large software library and an unusual disk controller distinguish this system.

p.337 FIVE VOICE SYNTHESIZERS

[author George H. Smith]

Linear predictive coding ICs provide quality output.

p.351 VOLITION'S MODULA-2 ON THE SAGE

[author Edward Joyce]

It's an enticing combination.

p.355 REVIEW FEEDBACK

Readers respond to previous reviews.

KERNEL

p.361 INTRODUCTION

p.363 COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR : ON THE ROAD

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Jerry's potpourri of observations includes a look at Thinkbnk, some PC clones, NewWord, and more.

p.385 CHAOS MANOR MAIL

Jerry's readers write, and he replies.

p.393 BYTE WEST COAST: NEWS FROM ALL OVER

[author John Markoff and Ezra Shapiro]

A new artificial-intelligence product and the latest upgrade of the ZCPR command processor for the Z80 are discussed.

p.407 BYTE JAPAN: SHOW TIME

[author William M. Raike]

Our correspondent reports on the 1984 Tokyo Microcomputer Show.

p.415 BYTE U.K,: THE SINCLAIR QL

[author Dick Pountain]

Sinclair Research may have been hasty in announcing its new 68008-based system.

(Nucleus)

p.6 EDITORIAL: MISSING SOFTWARE

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 LETTERS

p.33 FIXES AND UPDATES

p.39, 468 WHAT'S NEW

p.48 ASK BYTE

p.57 CLUBS AND NEWSLETTERS

p.63 BOOK REVIEWS

p.83 EVENT QUEUE

p.453 BOOKS RECEIVED

p.457 PROGRAMMING INSIGHT

p.462 TECHNICAL FORUM

p.525 UNCLASSIFIED ADS

p.526 BYTES ONGOING MONITOR BOX, BOMB RESULTS

p.527 READER SERVICE


Vol.9 n°11 october 1984

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FEATURES

p.107 INTRODUCTION

p.108 THE IBM PC AT

[author BYTE Staff]

IBM's latest offering provides powerful hardware with a split personality.

p.112 CIARCIA'S CIRCUIT CELLAR: AN ULTRASONIC RANGING SYSTEM

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Build your own SonarTape to measure distances from 1½ to 35 feet using sound waves.

p.124 USING A MOUSE WITH LOTUS 1-2-3

[author John Doolittle]

You can write a driver to adapt a Microsoft mouse for use with this popular interactive software package and other programs.

p.126 IMPLEMENTING CRYPTOGRAPHIC ALGORITHMS ON MICROCOMPUTERS

[author Charles Kluepfel]

The muMath/muSimp package lets you build 200-digit crypotographic keys on an Apple.

p.128 GENERATING AND TESTING PSEUDORANDOM NUMBERS

[author Charles A. Whitney]

When you want to analyze haphazard occurrences, some random-number generators may be more useful than others.

p.130 DATA ABSTRACTION

[author Gary F. Simons]

A BASIC program illustrates abstraction techniques that let you manipulate data structures without concern for the type of data that will populate these structures.

THEME: DATABASES

p.135 INTRODUCTION

p.137 DATABASE TYPES

[author Rich Krajewski]

There's more than one way to manage information.

p.147 TEXT DATABASES

[author Ezra Shapiro]

Integrating database and editing functions simplifies the creative process.

p.155 THE DAYFLO ARCHITECTURE

[author Robert W. Atkins and Walter L. Mazur]

Two DayFlo designers describe the internal workings of a free-form word-oriented database.

p.167 LOW-COST ON-LINE DATABASES

[author Matthew Lesko]

Using your computer to track down information doesn't have to be expensive.

p.177 THE PICK OPERATING SYSTEM , PART 1 : INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

[author Rick Cook and John Brandon]

This information-oriented operating system has a built-in relational database and multiuser capabilities.

p.203 ADDING A HARD DISK

[author Roy M. Matney]

An engineer discusses kits, components, and expansions for the IBM PC.

p.215 OPTICAL MEMORY: DATA STORAGE BY LASER

[author Edward S. Rothchild]

The technology continues to develop, and erasable media may soon be available.

p.227 A DATABASE CATALOG

[author George Bond]

This survey of 47 database-management programs may lead you to the system you need.

REVIEWS

p.243 INTRODUCTION

p.245 REVIEWER'S NOTEBOOK

[author Rich Malloy]

BYTE's product-review editor comments on XyWrite, two IBM compatibles, and more.

p.246 THE FUJITSU MICRO 16s

[author Alex Pournelle]

Adaptability is the system's greatest strength.

p.254 THE PANASONIC SR. PARTNER

[author Rich Malloy]

This IBM PC-compatible portable packs its own printer.

p.263 VOLKSWRITER DELUXE

[author Stevanne Ruth Lehrman]

Lifetree Softwares new package for the IBM PC is a serious word processor that's easy to use

p.271 HOMEWORD AND CUT & PASTE

[author Keith Carlson]

Both these word processors, intended for home use, are cheaper and simpler to use than those designed for the office, and both run on the Apple II series.

p.279 CLOUT AND SALVO

[author George Bond]

Two natural-language query programs for the IBM PC attempt to simplify the task of data retrieval.

p.289 DATAEASE VS. CONDOR AND dBASE II

[author Bill Jacobson]

Find out how the menu-driven program compares to two command-driven programs.

p.306 REVIEW FEEDBACK

Readers respond to previous reviews.

KERNEL

p.315 INTRODUCTION

p.317 COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR: MINOR PROBLEMS

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Jerry resolves a difficulty with his CompuPro 8/16 and goes on to report on a wide array of hardware and software.

p.346 CHAOS MANOR MAIL

Jerry's readers write, and he replies.

p.357 BYTE WEST COAST: FIDONET, SIDEKICK, APPLE, GET ORGANIZED!, AND HANDLE

[author John Markoff and Ezra Shapiro]

Two California-based editors comment on homebrew electronic mail, some integrated software, and other tidbits.

p.369 BYTE JAPAN : BITS AND PIECES

[author William M. Raike]

Highlights from the Japanese computing scene include news on the Hitachi CMOS 68000, the Brother EP-44, and the Casio FP-6000.

p.381 BYTE U.K.: POP AND SNAP

[author Dick Pountain]

Two artificial-intelligence languages offer alternatives to LISP and Prolog.

(Nucleus)

p.6 EDITORIAL: THE CHALLENGE OF THE HOME COMPUTER

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 LETTERS

p.33 FIXES AND UPDATES

p.39, 473 WHAT'S NEW

p.48 ASK BYTE

p.59 CLUBS AND NEWSLETTERS

p.65 BOOK REVIEWS

p.89 EVENT QUEUE

p.468 BOOKS RECEIVED

p.525 UNCLASSIFIED ADS

p.526 BYTES ONGOING MONITOR BOX, BOMB RESULTS

p.527 READER SERVICE


Vol.9 n°12 november 1984

byte_1984_11.jpg

byte_1984_11_index.jpg

byte_1984_11_index2.jpg

FEATURES

p.100 INTRODUCTION

p.102 THE DATA GENERAL/ONE

[author Gregg Williams and Ken Sheldon]

This battery-powered portable offers remarkable power per pound.

p.110 CIARCIAS CIRCUIT CELLAR : THE LIS'NER 1000

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Steve's low-cost, high-performance speech-recognition system uses the General Instruments SP1000 chip.

p.125 A Go BOARD FOR THE MACINTOSH

[author Bruce F. Webster]

The ancient strategy game finds a new setting in MacFORTH.

p.129 A TRAVESTY GENERATOR FOR MICROS

[author Hugh Kenner and Joseph O'Rourke]

Nonsense imitation requires clever text processing.

p.132 THE PICK OPERATING SYSTEM, PART 2: SYSTEM CONTROL

[author Rick Cook and John Brandon]

The concluding article of this series covers programming capabilities and control elements.

p.134 AGAT: A SOVIET APPLE II COMPUTER

[author Leo D. Bores, M.D.]

More than 25 years after Sputnik, the Soviets bring out an Apple II.

THEME: NEW CHIPS

p.140 INTRODUCTION

p.143 INTRODUCTION TO SEMICONDUCTORS

[author Alan R. Miller]

A professor discusses what they are and how they work.

p.159 THE MC68020 32-BIT MICROPROCESSOR

[author Paul F. Groepler and James Kennedy]

The latest member of Motorola's 68000 family includes on-board cache and virtual memory.

p.179 THE XTAR GRAPHICS MICROPROCESSOR

[author Terry Coleman and Skip Powers]

Two Xtar executives tell how this chip set draws filled-in polygons at superhigh speed.

p.191 RISC CHIPS

[author John Markoff]

RISC means longer programs but faster execution.

p.211 GALLIUM ARSENIDE CHIPS

[author Phillip Robinson]

A new semiconductor technology offers blazing speed.

p.231 THE 80286 MICROPROCESSOR

[author Paul Wells]

Intel's marketing manager for special programs, a former engineer, writes on the head of the iAPX 286 family.

p.247 THE PF474

[author Steve Rosenthal]

This coprocessor is optimized to perform string-search operations on text files.

REVIEWS

p.258 INTRODUCTION

p.261 REVIEWER'S NOTEBOOK

[author Rich Malloy]

p.262 THE HP 150 COMPUTER

[author Mark Haas]

The 8088-based touchscreen computer.

p.276 THE COLUMBIA MULTIPERSONAL COMPUTER-VP

[author Peter V. Callamaras]

An IBM PC-compatible, transportable system.

p.287 LEADING EDGE AND MULTIMATE

[author C J Puotinen]

Two word-processor programs for the IBM PC.

p.303 POLYFORTH AND PC/FORTH

[author Ernie Tello]

Two FORTH development systems for the IBM PC.

p.319 SAMNA WORD III

[author Rubin Rabinovitz]

A word processor for the IBM PC.

p.335 THE MANNESMANN TALLY SPIRIT 80 PRINTER

[author Mark J. Welch]

p.341 THE BROTHER HR-15 LETTER-QUALITY PRINTER

[author Peter V. Callamaras]

p.348 REVIEW FEEDBACK

Readers respond to previous reviews.

KERNEL

p.359 INTRODUCTION

p.361 COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR : NCC REFLECTIONS

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Can hobbyists survive in an industry dissolving in hype?

p.381 CHAOS MANOR MAIL

[author Jerry Pournelle]

p.387 BYTE WEST COAST: NEW DEVELOPMENTS

[author John Markoff, Phil Robinson, and Ezra Shapiro]

Three West Coast editors report on a dBASE compiler, new printer technology, pfs:Plan. and how to make the Macintosh talk.

p.401 BYTE JAPAN: TECHNOLOGY SHOCK

[author William M. Raike]

Our Tokyo correspondent discovers some surprising U.S. trends.

p.413 BYTE U.K.: A PLETHORA OF PORTABLES

[author Dick Pountain]

A whole family of Apricots and a pocket computer from Psion are in the news.

p.425 MATHEMATICAL RECREATIONS : TOGGLING FUNCTIONS

[author Michael W. Ecker]

This month's recreation involves an eccentric jailer's strange way of granting amnesty.

p.430 CIRCUIT CELLAR FEEDBACK

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Steve answers project-related queries from readers.

(Nucleus)

p.6 EDITORIAL: THE MYTH OF THE ISO-TECHIE

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 LETTERS

p.33 FIXES AND UPDATES

p.39, 520 WHAT'S NEW

p.48 ASK BYTE

p.59 CLUBS AND NEWSLETTERS

p.65 BOOK REVIEWS

p.83 EVENT QUEUE

p.495 BOOKS RECEIVED

p.505 APPLICATION NOTE

p.573 UNCLASSIFIED ADS

p.574 BYTES ONGOING MONITOR Box, BOMB RESULTS

p.575 READER SERVICE


Vol.9 n°13 december 1984

byte_1984_12.jpg

byte_1984_12_index.jpg

byte_1984_12_index2.jpg

FEATURES

p.96 INTRODUCTION

p.98 THE TANDY 1000

[author G . Michael Vose]

This 16-bit machine provides remarkable computing power at a surprisingly low price.

p.105 CIARCIAS CIRCUIT CELLAR : BUILD THE POWER I/O SYSTEM

[author Steve Ciarcia]

Use your computer to control ac/dc power.

p.119 C-LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT TOOLS

[author G. Michael Vose]

The Safe C Compiler/Profiler, the Instant-C interpreter, and the C Source Debugger are examined.

p.121 AN INTRODUCTION TO FIBER OPTICS, PART I

[author Richard S. Shuford]

Light tamed by glass waveguides offers wide communication bandwidth.

p.124 SOFTWARE FRAMEWORKS

[author Gregg Williams]

Software toolkits can save you programming time.

THEME: COMMUNICATIONS

p.128 INTRODUCTION

p.131 THE EVOLUTION OF A STANDARD ETHERNET

[author Edwin E. Mier]

The technology of local networking (Ethernet-style) is well established.

p.147 LOCAL-AREA NETWORKS FOR THE IBM PC

[author J. Scott Haugdahl]

Finding the one that best meets your needs can be quite a task.

p.179 HIGH-SPEED DIAL-UP MODEMS

[author Kim Maxwell]

The founder of Racal-Vadic reports on the promise and peril of faster data transmission.

p.187 WRITING COMMUNICATIONS IN BASIC

[author Barry J. Arnow]

Easy terminal emulation and file transfer can be yours to program.

p.199 LOOKING FOR THE PERFECT PROGRAM

[author David Barr and George deW. Rogers]

The authors discuss criteria for selecting communications software.

p.215 THE ON-LINE SEARCH

[author Suzana Lisanti]

Learn how to access the world's brain.

REVIEWS

p.234 INTRODUCTION

p.237 REVIEWER'S NOTEBOOK by

[author Rich Malloy]

p.239 THE TANDY MODEL 2000

[author Mark S. Jennings]

Radio Shack's 80186-based MS-DOS computer.

p.252 THE ZENITH Z-150 PC

[author Wayne Rash Jr]

An IBM PC-compatible system, also available in kit form.

p.263 TK!SOLVER

[author Alan R. Miller]

A "spreadsheet" for scientists.

p.277 WORDPERFECT

[author Ricardo Birmele]

A word processor for the IBM PC.

p.293 THE EPSON LQ-1500

[author Ken Sheldon]

A high-resolution dot-matrix printer.

p.301 REVIEW FEEDBACK

KERNEL

p.305 INTRODUCTION

p.307 COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR: HOME AGAIN

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Jerry admires the HP LaserJet printer and starts a quest for a clock board while Alex Pournelle takes a look at the TI Professional Computer.

p.335 CHAOS MANOR MAIL

[author Jerry Pournelle]

Jerry's readers write, and he replies.

p.343 BYTE WEST COAST: HAPPENINGS

[author John Markoff and Ezra Shapiro]

Two BYTE editors report on LAN standards, Concurrent PC-DOS, and IBM's acquisition of Rolm Corporation.

p.355 BYTE U.K.: PROLOG ON MICROCOMPUTERS

[author Dick Pountain]

Logical propositions replace computer-oriented instructions.

p.365 BYTE JAPAN: HAND-HELD COMPUTERS AND MSX STANDARDS

[author William M. Raike]

Hand-helds, the Big.APL portable, and MSX computer standards are in the news.

p.375 CIRCUIT CELLAR FEEDBACK

[author Steve Garcia]

Steve answers project-related queries from readers.

(Nucleus)

p.6 EDITORIAL: LOOKING BACK: 1984

p.9 MICROBYTES

p.14 LETTERS

p.33 FIXES AND UPDATES

p.39, 432 WHAT'S NEW

p.48 ASK BYTE

p.59 CLUBS & NEWSLETTERS

p.65 BOOK REVIEWS

p.83 EVENT QUEUE

p.411 APPLICATION NOTE

p.416 BOOKS RECEIVED

p.491 UNCLASSIFIED ADS

p.494 BYTES ONGOING MONITOR BOX, BOMB RESULTS

p.495 READER SERVICE