Vol.5 n°6 june 1980

Vol.5 n°6 june 1980

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

Foreground

p.24 AN ANSWER/ORIGINATE MODEM

Construction from precalibrated modules that eliminate the need for complicated adjustments makes this modem a practical project for the homebrewing hobbyist.

[author : Ronald G Parsons]

p.42 I/O EXPANSION FOR THE TRS-80, Part 2: Serial Ports

Along with a discussion of the theory of serial I/O ports, here's a design for an economical RS-232C interface that is compatible with standard TRS-80 software.

[author : Steve Ciarcia]

p.64 Z80 OP CODES FOR AN 8080 ASSEMBLER

Using predefined variable names, you can generate proper Z80 machine-language code.

[author : William T Powers]

p.96 COMMUNICATING IN TWO DIRECTIONS

With proper transmission lines, extra terminals can make your personal computer flexible and easy to access from many locations.

[author : Mark R Tichener]

p.122 A TIME-SHARING/MULTI-USER SUBSYSTEM FOR MICROPROCESSORS

This minimal hardware/software system shows that running multiple users on microcomputers is a simpler task to implement than most think.

[author : Don Kinzer]

p.140 A TELEPHONE-DIALING MICROCOMPUTER

Automatic telephone dialing can be done by two diverse methods.

[author : John Renbarger]

Background

p.88 MY TRS-80 TALKS TO MY CROMEMCO Z-2

Peripherals that were once dedicated to a single computer can now be shared by using this communications scheme.

[author : Rod Hallen]

p.108 UNDERSTANDING ISAM

Some microcomputers can use the indexed-sequential access method, known as ISAM, instead of random access or sequential access.

[author : Reginald D Gates]

p.214 INTERPERSONALIZED MEDIA: WHAT'S NEWS?

Decreasing costs and increasing availability of telecommunication facilities for microcomputers imply modes of communication vastly different from the ones we use today.

[author : James A Levin]

p.230 FIFTEEN: A GAME OF STRATEGY (OR TIC-TAC-TOE REVISITED)

This is a Nim-like game in which players try to pick numbers that will add up to 15.

[author : John Rheinstein]

Nucleus

p.6 Editorial: The Grass Roots Electronic Post Office...

p.12 Letters

p.84, 212, 228 BYTE's Bits

p.86 Ask BYTE

p.136 Book Reviews: The Network Nation: Human Communications via Computer

p.174 BYTELINES (formerly BYTE News)

p.182 BYTE's Bugs

p.186 BYTE's Bits: Bills Introduced in Congress

p.196 Technical Forum

A Race-Car Monitoring Program

Computing Time Between Dates

p.204 Event Queue

p.210 Clubs and Newsletters

p.238 Languages Forum: Comment and Correction for Mouse

p.242 What's New?

p.287 Unclassified Ads, BOMB Results

p.288 Reader Service, BOMB

ON THE COVER

On this month's cover, Robert Tinney has created a visual fantasy on a communications theme. Imagine a network of personal computers where each person's computer is a node. Each node can display some information about the network. The fantasy cover painting shows several such personal computers in a matrix of translucent network connections. A few message packets are in transit down gossamer conduits, and each computer shows a view of the network from that node's vantage point. As noted in this month's editorial, the real-world equivalent of this fantasy is the telephone network with low-speed modem equipment. While 300 bps is not the data communications equivalent of the bandwidth of a light beam, it is a good start which exists today. The nodes we know about via modems and telephones consist of our personalized directories of public access and private computer systems.