Vol.5 n°4 april 1980

Vol.5 n°4 april 1980

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

Foreground

p.96 COMPUTING THE I CHING WITH A TRS-80

If you cannot afford both a set of tortoise-shell casting wands and a personal computer, you should buy the computer and use the program in this article to peer into the Book of Changes.

[author : Dr Edwin Dethlefsen]

p.142 THE GREAT RACE AND MICRO DISK FILES, Horse Race Simulations

Here is a demonstration of some disk file management techniques used in a delightful game program.

[author : Joseph J Roehrig]

p.198 PROGRAM THOSE 2708s!

Programming this erasable programmable read-only memory for 8080-based microcomputers is easy with this author's hardware building and software usage methods.

[author : Robert Glaser]

p.212 APPLE AUDIO PROCESSING

Here is a simple interface you can add to an Apple II to allow audio input and output.

[author : Mark A Cross]

p.234 BUILD A LOW-COST EPROM ERASER

Do you need to change the programs in your erasable programmable read-only memory? Try building this ultraviolet EPROM eraser to do the job.

[author : L B Golter]

Background

p.18 USING THE COMPUTER AS A MUSICIAN'S AMANUENSIS, Part 1: Fundamental Problems

In the first of two parts, this author explores several musical concepts and poses some of the initial music-to-printed-score translation problems.

[author : Jef Raskin]

p.34 ADD A SIMPLE TEXT EDITOR TO YOUR BASIC PROGRAMS

Having a text formatting routine when you output large amounts of text is useful. Now you can see how easy It is to implement an editor in BASIC.

[author : Robert G A Goff]

p.40 EASE INTO 16-BIT COMPUTING, Part 2: Examining a Small Multi-User System

Last month, Steve told us about the 8088 processor's capabilities. Now he discusses a two-user system with Tiny BASIC that can be built using only five integrated circuits.

[author : Steve Ciarcia]

p.70 ADVANCED REAL-TIME MUSIC SYNTHESIS TECHNIQUES

This well-known computer music maker discusses the fine points of how he uses versatile digital-to-analog converters with a typical personal computer.

[author : Hal Chamberlin]

p.118 CALCULATING FILTER CAPACITOR VALUES FOR COMPUTER POWER SUPPLIES

Here is a homebrewer's explanation of how formulas and guidelines were developed for choosing a particular electronic component.

[author : John Thomas]

p.124 A GRAPHICS TEXT EDITOR FOR MUSIC, Part 1: Structure of the Editor

Now you can learn to enter musical scores into your computer by using a graphics tablet.

[author : Randolph Nelson]

Nucleus

p.6 Editorial: Bar Codes Revisited...

p.12 Letters

p.32, 240 BYTE's Bits

p.60, 68 Programming Quickies

An Animated Slot Machine in Color

A White Noise Generator for the Apple II

p.66, 220 BYTE's Bugs

p.104, 110 Technical Forum

MicroShakespeare

More GOTOXY

p.113 BYTE News

p.222 Clubs and Newsletters

p.226 Event Queue

p.242 What's New?

p.287 Unclassified Ads

p.288 Reader Service, BOMB

p.6 ON THE COVER

This month's cover features Hewlett-Packard's new bar code loader. The unit is described in detail in Carl Helmers' editorial on page 6. Bar codes, have been around for several years, in one form or another, but the HEDS-3000 Digital Wand is the first serious attempt to make bar codes a part of personal computing. Bar code readers will soon be used to enter recipe information into your microwave oven, read the bar codes on groceries, and enter programs into your computer. Also in this issue are several articles dealing with computer music. A lot has happened since our last special issue on music in September, 1977. Many of the new computers feature sound effects as a matter of course, such as the Atari and Texas Instruments models. This month Hal Chamberlin talks about recent developments in digital-to-analog (D/A) techniques for multiple-voice music generation; Jef Raskin describes a musical "amanuensis" or computerized music stenographer (the first of two parts); and Randolph Nelson reveals the details of how to enter and modify musical information into a computer quickly and efficiently.