Vol.5 n°3 march 1980

Vol.5 n°3 march 1980

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

Foreground

p.17 EASE INTO 16-BIT COMPUTING: GET 16-BIT PERFORMANCE FROM AN 8-BIT COMPUTER

Steve tells you how the Intel 8088 is well-suited for building a minimum-configuration 16-bit computer.

[author : Steve Ciarcia]

p.34 ELECTRON BEHAVIOR IN A CHEMICAL BOND

Learn how to use a computer to explore the inner processes of a molecule by finding solutions to the Schrödinger wave equation.

[author : Michael Liebl]

p.74 SOLVING PROBLEMS INVOLVING VARIABLE TERRAIN, PART 2: SPECIAL CASES, INCLUDING HEXAGONAL GRIDS

After developing a general algorithm last month, Scott now explores several modifications that may be applied to typical conflict-simulation problems.

[author : Scott T Jones]

p.126 A POWER-LINE PROTECTION CIRCUIT

For hobby applications where an isolation transformer is too big and expensive, this relay-based circuit can provide some protection from power-line wiring errors.

[author : Neil Schneider and Bror Erickson]

p.130 LANDING MODULE SIMULATION WITH RANDOM SURFACE

This game uses the Motorola MEK6800 D2 kit. It can be interfaced to display the landing approach on an oscilloscope.

[author : S J Houng]

p.142 THE DIRT-CHEAP BOOTSTRAP, MORE NOTES ON BRINGING UP A MICROCOMPUTER

An inexpensive way to add front-panel functions to a minimal microcomputer system.

[author : Albert S Woodhull]

p.156 HYDROCARBON MOLECULE CONSTRUCTOR

The program presented here uses the high-resolution graphics ability of the Apple II to give a visual representation of molecular bonding.

[author : Randall S Matthews]

p.232 SUPER TIC

This is a three-dimensional, 4-by-4-by-4, tic-tac-toe game that can play against a human opponent. The program has ten levels of expertise, is written in BASIC, and can be modified to run in two dimensions.

[author : J Roebrig]

Background

p.60 HEWLETT-PACKARD'S NEW PERSONAL COMPUTER, THE HP-85

A first look at a personal computer from a company esteemed for its calculators and minicomputers.

[author : Christopher P Morgan]

p.84 TRS-80 PERFORMANCE, EVALUATION BY PROGRAM TIMING

James provides us with a direct comparison of the TRS-80 computer with an IBM System/370.

[author : James R Lewis]

p.114 ELECTRONIC PLANIMETRY

These authors describe a situation in which a specialized tool was replaced by a general-purpose minicomputer.

[author : Peter A Santi, John Fryhofer and Gregory Hansen]

p.194 OPERATION CODES FOR 8080, 8085, AND Z80 PROCESSORS

The need to convert an assembler mnemonic to the hexadecimal object code often occurs when programming the 8080 microprocessor family. Here is a helpful summary of related information.

[author : D Martin Harrell]

p.230 TO ERR IS HUMAN

Techniques to enable your computer to detect and correct typographical errors In assembly-language programs.

[author : Roger A McGregor]

Nucleus

p.6 Editorial

Hunting the Computerized Eclipse

p.14 Letters

p.68, 212, 240 Programming Quickies

Gear-Ratio Calculations for Bicycle Derailleurs

and many more

p.108 BYTE News

p.168 Book Reviews

p.174 BYTE's Bits

p.176 Clubs and Newsletters

p.180 BYTE's Bugs

p.184 Product Review: Lucidata P-6800 Pascal

p.186 Technical Forum

The Direct Impact of the Computer

Cutting the Gregorian Knot

p.208 Desktop Wonder

The Periodic Chart at Your Fingertips....

p.218 Event Queue

p.246 What's New?

p.287 Unclassified Ads

p.288 Reader Service, BOMB

ON THE COVER

This month's cover theme is "Computers in the Laboratory." Personal computers can be employed as a tool of analysis and control in scientific applications. We celebrate this theme with a fantasy suggestive of one area of scientific application: an advanced color-graphics-oriented personal computer is shown over a Bunsen burner on a beaker stand. On the terminal is a high-resolution image of some liquid boiling. This computer, without floppy-disk drives, certainly suggests a future direction: built-in, permanent mass storage with sufficient capacity to eliminate any need for removable media. We might even conjecture that a pattern is shown here being "boiled" into a bubble memory.

1979 5.03 1981