Vol.5 n°2 february 1980

Vol.5 n°2 february 1980

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

Foreground

p.18 A FIRST LOOK AT GRAPH THEORY APPUCATIONS

If the use of graph theory raises a question, this article will supply an answer. The authors introduce the fundamental concepts of graph theory and two methods of directed-graph storage.

[author : Michael Ashbrook and Helmut Zinn]

p.32 A COMPUTER-CONTROLLED WOOD STOVE

Steve Garcia shows how he uses his computer to monitor and control a Hydrostove - a wood stove that heats water piped through it.

[author : Steve Ciarcia]

p.72 A COMPUTER-CONTROLLED LIGHT DIMMER, Part 2: Implementation

Part 2 of this article shows how to construct the design that was presented in the January 1980 BYTE, using the Heathkit ET-3400 microprocessor trainer.

[author : John H Gibson]

p.92 IMPLEMENTING DYNAMIC DATA STRUCTURES WITH BASIC FILES

Using linked lists to maintain sorted files is one way to deal with limited memory, large files, and additions and deletions to these files.

[author : Ted Carter]

p.106 A FAST, MULTIBYTE BINARY TO BINARY-CODED-DECIMAL CONVERSION ROUTINE

This general-purpose algorithm performs these conversions and assembler programs for the 8080 processor.

[author : Michael McQuade]

p.192 A FINANCIAL ANALYSES PROGRAM

Most investors will agree that financial stability and success require an organized systematic means of assessing investments. The program written by John Lehman can output the typical information required for such a financial report.

[author : John H Lehman]

p.202 ANOTHER PLOTTER TO TOY WITH, REVISITED: Design and Construction Details

Robert Newcomb tells how to construct and program the low-cost plotting system described by Peter Lucas in the February 1979 BYTE. Robert uses a KIM-I and various electromechanical parts.

[author : Robert K Newcomb]

Background

p.58 SOLVING PROBLEMS INVOLVING VARIABLE TERRAIN, Part 1: A General Algorithm

The method described by Scott Jones can be applied to a wide range of problems in business and industry as well as conflict simulations and games.

[author : Scott T Jones]

p.116 A QUAD TERMINAL INTERFACE

Building this interface solves the occasional problem of having one interface port and the need to use three or four peripherals.

[author : Stephen A Alpert]

p.128 COMPARISON OF SOME HIGH-LEVEL LANGUAGES

Some programming languages are more appropriate to a particular application than others. This comparison will help you choose the right language from the many possibilities.

[author : Robert A Morris]

p.176 BASIC FORMATTED OUTPUT

The feature provided here will give your BASIC package the control where a particular piece of information will appear on a line when you are performing input and output routines.

[author : William D Roch]

Nucleus

p.6 Editorial

The Seven Bridges of Königsberg

p.14 Letters

p.69 BYTE News

p.82, 86 Programming Quickies

Gasuse

String Comparator for Horizon

p.88 Clubs and Newsletters

p.140, 146, 172, 174 Technical Forum:

Some Example Plots

Introduction to Code Tightening

Mining the Skip Chain for Extra Bytes of Code

Audio Meter for Your TRS-80

Algebraic Identities Are Not Numerical Identities

p.154 Event Queue

p.162, 208 BYTE's Bits

p.168, 208 BYTE's Bugs

p.188 Book Reviews

p.212 What's New?

p.255 Unclassified Ads

p.256 Reader Service, BOMB

ON THE COVER

Topology is the theme of this month's cover painting, "The Seven Bridges of Königsberg" by Robert Tinney. It is a fanciful representation of a classical, topological problem made famous by the Swiss mathematician Euler, and it has a more than passing resemblance to the works of the Swiss artist M C Escher. The celebrated problem is discussed in detail by Carl Helmers in this month's editorial, and the Painting is also loosely inspired by the theme article, "A First Look at Graph Theory Applications," by Ashbrook and Zinn. Sharp-eyed readers might spot a visual reference to another famous mathematical problem hidden in the cover.