Vol.4 n°6 june 1979

Vol.4 n°6 june 1979

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

Foreground

p.10 A MODEL OF THE BRAIN FOR ROBOT CONTROL. Part 1: Defining Notation

p.10 A MODEL OF THE BRAIN FOR ROBOT CONTROL. Part 1: Defining Notation

Defining the mathematical notation for a model of the brain

[author : James Albus]

p.49 MIND OVER MATTER: Add Biofeedback Input to Your Computer

p.49 MIND OVER MATTER: Add Biofeedback Input to Your Computer

Use muscle signals to produce computer input

[author : Steve Ciarcia]

p.100 COMPUTER GENERATED MAPS, Part 2

p.100 COMPUTER GENERATED MAPS, Part 2

A general purpose perspective projection program

[author : William D Johnston]

p.132 THE NATURE OF ROBOTS. Part 1: Defining Behavior

p.132 THE NATURE OF ROBOTS. Part 1: Defining Behavior

How can behavior of an organism be described?

[author : William T Powers]

p.176 DESIGNING A COMMAND LANGUAGE

p.176 DESIGNING A COMMAND LANGUAGE

Using theory of finite state machines to design input command language

[author : G A Van den Bout]

Background

p.36 SIMPLE MAZE TRAVERSAL ALGORITHMS

p.36 SIMPLE MAZE TRAVERSAL ALGORITHMS

A contestant of the IEEE Micromouse Contest discusses maze running strategies

[author : Sandra and Stephen A Allen]

p.60 MORE COLORS FOR YOUR APPLE

p.60 MORE COLORS FOR YOUR APPLE

Any pair of complementary colors can be displayed

[author : Allen Watson III]

p.70 A HOME FOR YOUR COMPUTER

p.70 A HOME FOR YOUR COMPUTER

Increase the utility and enjoyability of your equipment with a carefully planned cabinet

[author : Joseph Dawes]

p.74 TALK TO A TURTLE: Build a Computer Controlled Robot

p.74 TALK TO A TURTLE: Build a Computer Controlled Robot

Use your computer to control a mobile "robot"

[author : James A Gupton Jr]

p.86 MY COMPUTER RUNS MAZES

p.86 MY COMPUTER RUNS MAZES

Using simple tree searches to reach a goal

[author : David E Stanfield]

p.146 The 1802 OP CODES

p.146 The 1802 OP CODES

The instruction set of the RCA/Hughes 1802 microprocessor

[author : Henry Melton]

p.148 THE HISTORY OF COMPUTING: THE IBM 7070

p.148 THE HISTORY OF COMPUTING: THE IBM 7070

The IBM 7070 might have been the start of a new decimal, based computer family

[author : Keith S Reid-Green]

p.152 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND ENTROPY

p.152 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND ENTROPY

Chemistry, artificial intelligence, and the second law of thermodynamics

[author : R M Kiehn]

p.156 BASIC TEXT EDITOR

p.156 BASIC TEXT EDITOR

The right tool for the job is often a text editor in BASIC

[author : Fred Ruckdeschel]

p.166 BUBBLE MEMORIES A Short Tutorial

p.166 BUBBLE MEMORIES A Short Tutorial

A nonvolatile, medium speed, data storage device

[author : A I Halsema]

p.168 STACKS IN MICROPROCESSORS

p.168 STACKS IN MICROPROCESSORS

Learn the ups and downs of stacks in your microprocessor

[author : T Radhakrishnan and M V Bhat]

p.228 TIMESHARING: SQUEEZING THE MOST FROM YOUR MICRO

p.228 TIMESHARING: SQUEEZING THE MOST FROM YOUR MICRO

Microcomputers come of age with timesharing

[author : Sheldon Linker]

p.234 THREE TYPES OF PSEUDORANDOM SEQUENCES

p.234 THREE TYPES OF PSEUDORANDOM SEQUENCES

Use of random numbers is more than just an everyday occurrence

[author : C Brian Honess]

Nucleus

p.6 Editorial: On Beginning a New Project

p.6 Editorial: On Beginning a New Project

p.8 Letters

p.8 Letters

p.129 BYTE News

p.129 BYTE News

p.188 Technical Forum

p.188 Technical Forum

p.194 Nybbles: The Great APL Contest

p.194 Nybbles: The Great APL Contest

p.198 Book Reviews

p.198 Book Reviews

p.206 Programming Quickies

p.206 Programming Quickies

p.213 Clubs and Newsletters

p.213 Clubs and Newsletters

p.133, 214 BYTE's Bugs

p.133, 214 BYTE's Bugs

p.218 Languages Forum

p.218 Languages Forum

p.223 Event Queue

p.223 Event Queue

p.133, 225 BYTEs Bits

p.133, 225 BYTEs Bits

p.249 Whats New?

p.249 Whats New?

p.286 Unclassified Ads

p.286 Unclassified Ads

p.288 BOMB

p.288 BOMB

p.288 Reader Service

p.288 Reader Service

In this BYTE

This month's cover by Ken Lodding is called "The Turing Test," after the famous test defined by Alan Turing. It was Turing's contention that a computer could be judged as intelligent if a human questioner could not differentiate between a computer in one room and a human being in another. The basis for the cover painting is the Necker cube, an optical illusion where it is unclear which end of the cube is in front. The question here is: Is it the human or the computer circuit connected to the keyboard?

p.10 Before discussing the design of A Model of the Brain for Robot Control, it is necessary to define the notation that will be used in the model. James Albus discusses the overall model objectives and the notation used to describe it, drawing on control systems theory. page 10

p.10 Before discussing the design of A Model of the Brain for Robot Control, it is necessary to define the notation that will be used in the model. James Albus discusses the overall model objectives and the notation used to describe it, drawing on control systems theory. page 10

p.36 The IEEE Micromouse contest requires that a mechanical "mouse" find its way through a maze. The winner is the mouse that makes it through the maze in the least amount of time. Sandra and Stephen A Allen discuss some of the Simple Maze Traversal Algorithms they and Tony Rossetti used for the Micromouse contest. page 36

p.36 The IEEE Micromouse contest requires that a mechanical "mouse" find its way through a maze. The winner is the mouse that makes it through the maze in the least amount of time. Sandra and Stephen A Allen discuss some of the Simple Maze Traversal Algorithms they and Tony Rossetti used for the Micromouse contest. page 36

p.48 The types of input ava ilable for your computer are limited only by the imagin ation This month Steve Ciarcia uses Mind Over Matter to control his computer. Find out how to influence your computer using muscle power. page 48

p.48 The types of input ava ilable for your computer are limited only by the imagin ation This month Steve Ciarcia uses Mind Over Matter to control his computer. Find out how to influence your computer using muscle power. page 48

p.60 Although the official documentation for the Apple II high resolution color graphics package states that the colors violet and green are the only colors besides black and white which may be obtained, adjustment of the television controls allows any pair of complementary colors to be displayed. It is also possible to obtain four colors and black and white with appropriate adjustments. Allen Watson III explains how in his article More Colors for Your Apple. page 60

p.60 Although the official documentation for the Apple II high resolution color graphics package states that the colors violet and green are the only colors besides black and white which may be obtained, adjustment of the television controls allows any pair of complementary colors to be displayed. It is also possible to obtain four colors and black and white with appropriate adjustments. Allen Watson III explains how in his article More Colors for Your Apple. page 60

p.70 If you enjoy taking your computer system to club meetings or other events, but don't look forward to the attendant wire fiddling and fuss, read A Home for Your Computer by Joseph Dawes. Now you can have a compact computer storage and travel case that doubles as a desk. page 70

p.70 If you enjoy taking your computer system to club meetings or other events, but don't look forward to the attendant wire fiddling and fuss, read A Home for Your Computer by Joseph Dawes. Now you can have a compact computer storage and travel case that doubles as a desk. page 70

p.74 One of the most interesting applications of your computer is the control of physical devices. Perhaps you've thought of having a robot-like device that your computer could control. James Gupton Jr describes the fun that he and two of his students had when they set out to do just that in Talk to a Turtle. page 74

p.74 One of the most interesting applications of your computer is the control of physical devices. Perhaps you've thought of having a robot-like device that your computer could control. James Gupton Jr describes the fun that he and two of his students had when they set out to do just that in Talk to a Turtle. page 74

p.86 It's not hard to put a bit of artificial intelligence into you r computer system. David Stanfield found a way to make his system search for "food" in a maze he set up. Find out how to do it in My Computer Runs Mazes. page 86

p.86 It's not hard to put a bit of artificial intelligence into you r computer system. David Stanfield found a way to make his system search for "food" in a maze he set up. Find out how to do it in My Computer Runs Mazes. page 86

p.100 William D Johnston develops a general purpose program with the capability to generate a wide variety of more advanced perspective projections. He includes a functional program with great versatility, as well as a number of maps generated by that program. Mr Johnston shows how Computer Generated Maps can be used in satellite communications and many other practical applications. page 100

p.100 William D Johnston develops a general purpose program with the capability to generate a wide variety of more advanced perspective projections. He includes a functional program with great versatility, as well as a number of maps generated by that program. Mr Johnston shows how Computer Generated Maps can be used in satellite communications and many other practical applications. page 100

p.132 William T Powers has a control theory approach to the simulation of human behavior. However, before we can simulate human behavior in a robot, we must determine what behavior is. William Powers takes a look at behavioral actions as he explores The Nature of Robots. page 132

p.132 William T Powers has a control theory approach to the simulation of human behavior. However, before we can simulate human behavior in a robot, we must determine what behavior is. William Powers takes a look at behavioral actions as he explores The Nature of Robots. page 132

p.146 When hand-assembling a program it is useful to have a table summarizing the op codes for the processor. Henry Melton supplies us with a table for The 1802 Op Codes. page 146

p.146 When hand-assembling a program it is useful to have a table summarizing the op codes for the processor. Henry Melton supplies us with a table for The 1802 Op Codes. page 146

p.148 Keith S Reid-Green continues his History of Computing discussion with a look at The IBM 7070, a second generation computer announced in 1959. page 148

p.148 Keith S Reid-Green continues his History of Computing discussion with a look at The IBM 7070, a second generation computer announced in 1959. page 148

p.152 Some scientists over the years have argued that a thinking machine can not be built because it would violate the second law of thermodynamics. In Artificial Intelligence and Entropy author R M Kiehn discusses some recently completed work in chemistry that refutes this claim and opens the door once more to the possibility of intelligence in machines. page 152

p.152 Some scientists over the years have argued that a thinking machine can not be built because it would violate the second law of thermodynamics. In Artificial Intelligence and Entropy author R M Kiehn discusses some recently completed work in chemistry that refutes this claim and opens the door once more to the possibility of intelligence in machines. page 152

p.156 When performing a lot of manipulations with text it is necessary to have the ability to perform editing functions on the file that is being used. If you have a computer system that runs BASIC, you may find that Fred Ruckdeschel's BASIC Text Editor is a very handy tool. page 156

p.156 When performing a lot of manipulations with text it is necessary to have the ability to perform editing functions on the file that is being used. If you have a computer system that runs BASIC, you may find that Fred Ruckdeschel's BASIC Text Editor is a very handy tool. page 156

p.166 Bubble memories are a fairly new form of mass storage medium that is available to the general public. For a quick overview of Texas Instruments' bubble memory product, see A I Halsema's article Bubble Memories. page 166

p.166 Bubble memories are a fairly new form of mass storage medium that is available to the general public. For a quick overview of Texas Instruments' bubble memory product, see A I Halsema's article Bubble Memories. page 166

p.168 What is a stack? What does LIFO mean? Stacks can be important tools for the computer programmer. Knowing what they are and how to use them will aid you in improving your programming skills. Find out how stacks stack up in T Radhakrishnan and M V Bhat's article, Stacks in Microprocessors. page 168

p.168 What is a stack? What does LIFO mean? Stacks can be important tools for the computer programmer. Knowing what they are and how to use them will aid you in improving your programming skills. Find out how stacks stack up in T Radhakrishnan and M V Bhat's article, Stacks in Microprocessors. page 168

p.176 An input command language is often regarded as the least important part of a system. Therefore, some excellent systems are ignored due to the inconvenience encountered when trying to use them. Finite state machine theory is one solution to this problem. For an excellent introduction to the world of finite state machines read G A Van den Bout's artic le on Designing a Command Language. page 176

p.176 An input command language is often regarded as the least important part of a system. Therefore, some excellent systems are ignored due to the inconvenience encountered when trying to use them. Finite state machine theory is one solution to this problem. For an excellent introduction to the world of finite state machines read G A Van den Bout's artic le on Designing a Command Language. page 176

p.228 Have you ever considered using your computer system in a timesharing mode? To discover what is involved in setting up such a system. read Timesharing: Squeezing the Most from Your Micro by Sheldon Linker. page 228

p.228 Have you ever considered using your computer system in a timesharing mode? To discover what is involved in setting up such a system. read Timesharing: Squeezing the Most from Your Micro by Sheldon Linker. page 228

p.234 Calculating randomness is a very deterministic proposition, especially when pseudorandom number sequences are used. C Brian Honess in his article on Three Types of Pseudorandom Sequences gives some necessary background information on random number calculations and statistical tests of randomness. page 234

p.234 Calculating randomness is a very deterministic proposition, especially when pseudorandom number sequences are used. C Brian Honess in his article on Three Types of Pseudorandom Sequences gives some necessary background information on random number calculations and statistical tests of randomness. page 234