Vol.4 n°5 may 1979

Vol.4 n°5 may 1979

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

Foreground

p.10 COMPUTER GENERATED MAPS, Part 1

p.10 COMPUTER GENERATED MAPS, Part 1

Maps help make the arrangement of numeric data meaningful

[author : William D Johnston]

p.14 REPRESENTING THREE-DIMENSIONAL OBJECTS IN YOUR COMPUTER

p.14 REPRESENTING THREE-DIMENSIONAL OBJECTS IN YOUR COMPUTER

Using a digitizer to input graphical data

[author : Richard Blum]

p.32 COMMUNICATE ON A LIGHT BEAM

p.32 COMMUNICATE ON A LIGHT BEAM

Transmit digital Information over a beam of light

[author : Steve Ciarcia]

p.52 SINGLE CHIP VIDEO CONTROLLER

p.52 SINGLE CHIP VIDEO CONTROLLER

Controlling a video display with a single Integrated circuit

[author : Bob Haas]

p.130 THE INTEL 8275 CRT CONTROLLER

p.130 THE INTEL 8275 CRT CONTROLLER

This controller device eases video display design

[author : Chris Tennant]

Background

p.50 THE SUPERBOARD II. A Surprising Single Board Computer From OSI

p.50 THE SUPERBOARD II. A Surprising Single Board Computer From OSI

This single board computer can be expanded to a full-scale system

[author : Chris Morgan]

p.104 6800 DISASSEMBLER

p.104 6800 DISASSEMBLER

Decipher your machine code programs

[author : Bob Lentz]

p.110 SPACEWAR IN TINY BASIC, Navigating Through Integer BASIC

p.110 SPACEWAR IN TINY BASIC, Navigating Through Integer BASIC

A space navigation application

[author : David J Beard]

p.150 SMART MEMORY, Part 2

p.150 SMART MEMORY, Part 2

A black box approach to associative memory design

[author : Randy C Smith]

p.164 SIMULTANEOUS INPUT AND OUTPUT FOR YOUR 8080

p.164 SIMULTANEOUS INPUT AND OUTPUT FOR YOUR 8080

A roundabout method of I/O

[author : W D Maurer]

p.176 QUEUING THEORY, THE SCIENCE OF WAIT CONTROL Part 2: System Types

p.176 QUEUING THEORY, THE SCIENCE OF WAIT CONTROL Part 2: System Types

Looking at realistic situations

[author : Len Gorney]

p.184 TRIGONOMETRY IN TWO EASY BLACK BOXES

p.184 TRIGONOMETRY IN TWO EASY BLACK BOXES

Calculate trigonometric functions using arithmetic operations

[author : John A Ball]

p.196 TIC-TAC-TOE: A PROGRAMMING EXERCISE

p.196 TIC-TAC-TOE: A PROGRAMMING EXERCISE

How to approach a programming task

[author : Delmer D Hinrichs]

p.218 THE HOBBY UNWRAP

p.218 THE HOBBY UNWRAP

How to unwrap what was previously wrapped

[author : Ralph Stirling]

p.233 A MINI DISASSEMBLER FOR THE 2650

p.233 A MINI DISASSEMBLER FOR THE 2650

A disassembler can save countless headaches

[author : Edward R Teja and Gary Gonnella]

p.238 AIDS FOR HAND ASSEMBLING PROGRAMS

p.238 AIDS FOR HAND ASSEMBLING PROGRAMS

A personal routine helps increase accuracy

[author : Erich A Pfeiffer]

Nucleus

p.6 Editorial: Don't Forget the Hardware...

p.6 Editorial: Don't Forget the Hardware...

p.8 Letters

p.8 Letters

p.30, 210 Technical Forum

p.30, 210 Technical Forum

p.117 BYTE News

p.117 BYTE News

p.124 Event Queue

p.124 Event Queue

p.128 Nybbles: TMS-9900 Monitor

p.128 Nybbles: TMS-9900 Monitor

p.174, 268 BYTE's Bits

p.174, 268 BYTE's Bits

p.182 Desktop Wonder: Digits

p.182 Desktop Wonder: Digits

p.204 Clubs and Newsletters

p.204 Clubs and Newsletters

p.205 BYTE's bug

p.205 BYTE's bug

p.206 Languages Forum

p.206 Languages Forum

p.209 Machine Language Puzzler:An added attraction

p.209 Machine Language Puzzler:An added attraction

p.220 Programming Quickies

p.220 Programming Quickies

p.226 Book Reviews

p.226 Book Reviews

p.249 What's New?

p.249 What's New?

p.286 Unclassified Ads

p.286 Unclassified Ads

p.288 BOMB

p.288 BOMB

p.288 Reader Service

p.288 Reader Service

Cover Art: BENEATH THE GRID

[author : Robert Tinney]

In this BYTE

This issue's theme is provided by an article on various cartographic projections by William Johnston. To emphasize this theme of mapping terrain with computer models, Robert Tinney's painting "Beneath The Grid" shows a landscape with a superimposed grid of luminescent white lines as might be projected in the mind's eye by an appropriate graphic output device.

p.10 Microcomputers allow the quick and easy performance of operations that take an extemely long time to perform by hand. One of these operations is drawing maps from accumulated tables of data. William Johnston describes the simple programs used to produce Computer Generated Maps. page 10

p.10 Microcomputers allow the quick and easy performance of operations that take an extemely long time to perform by hand. One of these operations is drawing maps from accumulated tables of data. William Johnston describes the simple programs used to produce Computer Generated Maps. page 10

p.14 A data tablet is a graphical input device that enables you to enter visual images into your computer. Richard Blum has a program for Representing Three·Dimensional Objects in Your Computer. page 14

p.14 A data tablet is a graphical input device that enables you to enter visual images into your computer. Richard Blum has a program for Representing Three·Dimensional Objects in Your Computer. page 14

p.32 If you need to communicate digital information from one point to another through an electrically noisy environment, then optical communications may be one solution. If you are going to communicate over long distances or at high speeds, then a laser may be the best choice for a light source. This month Steve Ciarcia explains how to Communicate on a light Beam. page 32

p.32 If you need to communicate digital information from one point to another through an electrically noisy environment, then optical communications may be one solution. If you are going to communicate over long distances or at high speeds, then a laser may be the best choice for a light source. This month Steve Ciarcia explains how to Communicate on a light Beam. page 32

p.50 The people interested in just wetting their feet in the field of microcomputers are usually not looking for a very big system. A single board computer is often a good first experience. The Ohio Scientific Superboard II is one single board computer which has some interesting capabilities. Find out what Chris Morgan thinks about The Superboard II. page 50

p.50 The people interested in just wetting their feet in the field of microcomputers are usually not looking for a very big system. A single board computer is often a good first experience. The Ohio Scientific Superboard II is one single board computer which has some interesting capabilities. Find out what Chris Morgan thinks about The Superboard II. page 50

p.52 Flexible video displays have been made possible by special display controllers. Bob Haas describes four devices from different manufacturers and tells how he used a specific video display controller in a successful construction project. You can learn more about these single integrated circuit marvels in Single Chip Video Controller. page 52

p.52 Flexible video displays have been made possible by special display controllers. Bob Haas describes four devices from different manufacturers and tells how he used a specific video display controller in a successful construction project. You can learn more about these single integrated circuit marvels in Single Chip Video Controller. page 52

p.104 If you do not have documentation for a machine language program, it is almost impossible to determine how the program works. Bob Lentz describes a 6800 Disassembler that he wrote for his SwTPC 6800 system. page 104

p.104 If you do not have documentation for a machine language program, it is almost impossible to determine how the program works. Bob Lentz describes a 6800 Disassembler that he wrote for his SwTPC 6800 system. page 104

p.110 Possession of an integer arithmetic language does not preclude the writing of intricate programs involving trigonometric functions. David J Beard describes how he used an integer BASIC to develop navigation routines for Spacewar in Tiny BASIC. page 110

p.110 Possession of an integer arithmetic language does not preclude the writing of intricate programs involving trigonometric functions. David J Beard describes how he used an integer BASIC to develop navigation routines for Spacewar in Tiny BASIC. page 110

p.130 The most prevalent form of output from a personal computer seems to be a video display. Therefore, the serious hobbyist should be aware of the number of different video display controllers that are available. Chris Tennant looked at the Intel 8275 video display controller and liked what he saw. In his article he describes a video interface using The Intel 8275 CRT Controller. page 130

p.130 The most prevalent form of output from a personal computer seems to be a video display. Therefore, the serious hobbyist should be aware of the number of different video display controllers that are available. Chris Tennant looked at the Intel 8275 video display controller and liked what he saw. In his article he describes a video interface using The Intel 8275 CRT Controller. page 130

p.150 In part 2 of Smart Memory, Randy Smith presents a series of black box diagrams to describe the workings of an associative memory. page 150

p.150 In part 2 of Smart Memory, Randy Smith presents a series of black box diagrams to describe the workings of an associative memory. page 150

p.164 The "wraparound" queue can save you time during input and output operations on your computer. W D Maurer explains how the queue works and how to implement it on 8080 computer systems in Simultaneous In· put and Output for Your 8080. page 164

p.164 The "wraparound" queue can save you time during input and output operations on your computer. W D Maurer explains how the queue works and how to implement it on 8080 computer systems in Simultaneous In· put and Output for Your 8080. page 164

p.176 Last month Len Gorney described how to implement a queue on a computer. This month he talks about real life queues and how the science of Queuing Theory can be applied. page 176

p.176 Last month Len Gorney described how to implement a queue on a computer. This month he talks about real life queues and how the science of Queuing Theory can be applied. page 176

p.184 The CORDIC algorithm is a venerable and efficient method for calculating trigonometric functions. John A Ball gives some practical suggestions to experimenters in Trigonometry in Two Easy Black Boxes. Find out how you can streamline your number crunching with CORDIC. page 184

p.184 The CORDIC algorithm is a venerable and efficient method for calculating trigonometric functions. John A Ball gives some practical suggestions to experimenters in Trigonometry in Two Easy Black Boxes. Find out how you can streamline your number crunching with CORDIC. page 184

p.196 Good programming techniques are vital in personal computing as well as in computing in general. Author Delmer D Hinrichs, using tic-tac-toe as an example, describes the strategies of the game programmer in Tic·Tac·Toe: A Programming Exercise. page 196

p.196 Good programming techniques are vital in personal computing as well as in computing in general. Author Delmer D Hinrichs, using tic-tac-toe as an example, describes the strategies of the game programmer in Tic·Tac·Toe: A Programming Exercise. page 196

p.218 Ralph Stirling describes how to turn a motorized wire wrap tool into a motorized unwrapping tool in The Hobby Unwrap. page 218

p.218 Ralph Stirling describes how to turn a motorized wire wrap tool into a motorized unwrapping tool in The Hobby Unwrap. page 218

p.233 For owners of Signetics 2650 based computer systems, Edward R Teja and Gary Gonnella have provided a useful disassembler program to help make sense of those hexadecimal machine language listings. Read A Mini-Disassembler for the 2650. page 233

p.233 For owners of Signetics 2650 based computer systems, Edward R Teja and Gary Gonnella have provided a useful disassembler program to help make sense of those hexadecimal machine language listings. Read A Mini-Disassembler for the 2650. page 233

p.238 If your microcomputer lacks an assembler or high level language, it will be necessary to hand assemble all of your programs. To do this quickly and accurately it is a good idea to develop a consistent routine . Erich Pfeiffer describes a useful technique in Aids for Hand Assembling Programs. page 238

p.238 If your microcomputer lacks an assembler or high level language, it will be necessary to hand assemble all of your programs. To do this quickly and accurately it is a good idea to develop a consistent routine . Erich Pfeiffer describes a useful technique in Aids for Hand Assembling Programs. page 238