Vol.3 n°8 august 1978

Vol.3 n°8 august 1978

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

Foreground

p.50 COMPILATION AND PASCAL ON THE NEW MICROPROCESSORS

p.50 COMPILATION AND PASCAL ON THE NEW MICROPROCESSORS

[theme : Tutorial] [author : Forsyth-Howard]

p.78 PASCAL: A Structurally Strong Language

p.78 PASCAL: A Structurally Strong Language

[theme : Languages] [author : Alpert]

p.143 DESIGNING STRUCTURED PROGRAMS

p.143 DESIGNING STRUCTURED PROGRAMS

[theme : Programming Techniques] [author : Weems]

p.156 LET YOUR FINGERS DO THE TALKING: Add a Noncontact Touch Scanner

p.156 LET YOUR FINGERS DO THE TALKING: Add a Noncontact Touch Scanner

[theme : Hardware] [author : Ciarcia]

Background

p.24 ON BUILDING A LIGHT-SEEKING ROBOT MECHANISM

p.24 ON BUILDING A LIGHT-SEEKING ROBOT MECHANISM

[theme : Robotics Applications] [author : Allen-Rossetti]

p.64 THE NUMBER CRUNCHING PROCESSOR

p.64 THE NUMBER CRUNCHING PROCESSOR

[theme : Hardware] [author : Nelson]

p.90 PHILADELPHIA'S 179 YEAR OLD ANDROID

p.90 PHILADELPHIA'S 179 YEAR OLD ANDROID

[theme : History] [author : Penniman]

p.96 ANTIQUE MECHANICAL COMPUTERS, Part 2

p.96 ANTIQUE MECHANICAL COMPUTERS, Part 2

[theme : History] [author : Williams]

p.110 IN PRAISE OF PASCAL

p.110 IN PRAISE OF PASCAL

[theme : Software] [author : Mundie]

p.122 PASCAL VERSUS COBOL: Where Pascal Gets Down to Business

p.122 PASCAL VERSUS COBOL: Where Pascal Gets Down to Business

[theme : Software] [author : Bowles]

p.166 JACPOT

p.166 JACPOT

[theme : Games] [author : Hastings]

p.168 PASCAL VERSUS BASIC: An Exercise

p.168 PASCAL VERSUS BASIC: An Exercise

[theme : Software] [author : Schwartz]

Nucleus

p.4 In This BYTE

p.4 In This BYTE

p.6 A Vision of an Industry

p.6 A Vision of an Industry

p.10 Letters

p.10 Letters

p.12 Technical Forum:

p.12 Technical Forum:

A Letter Exchange: Extending S-100 Bus?

And Some Notes by John C McCallum

p.16 About the Cover

p.16 About the Cover

p.46 Languages Forum: A Homebrew Pascal Compiler

p.46 Languages Forum: A Homebrew Pascal Compiler

p.48 Clubs, Newsletters

p.48 Clubs, Newsletters

p.62 BYTE's Bugs

p.62 BYTE's Bugs

p.89 Consistency - or a Lack Thereof...Notes by C Helmers

p.89 Consistency - or a Lack Thereof...Notes by C Helmers

p.117 Languages Forum: A Proposed Pascal Compiler

p.117 Languages Forum: A Proposed Pascal Compiler

p.118 Event Queue

p.118 Event Queue

p.177 What's New?

p.177 What's New?

p.206 Unclassified Ads

p.206 Unclassified Ads

p.208 BOMB

p.208 BOMB

p.208 Reader Service

p.208 Reader Service

In this BYTE

p.24 What are readers' experiences with building actual robotic mechanisms? Stephen A Allen and Anthony J Rossetti's commentary On Building a Light-Seeking Robot Mechanism describes their work in this area on an undergraduate engineering project. An on board computer helps their robot decide what action to take when avoiding obstacles between it and a light source. page 24

p.24 What are readers' experiences with building actual robotic mechanisms? Stephen A Allen and Anthony J Rossetti's commentary On Building a Light-Seeking Robot Mechanism describes their work in this area on an undergraduate engineering project. An on board computer helps their robot decide what action to take when avoiding obstacles between it and a light source. page 24

p.50 Until now microprocessor users had the choice of using either an 8 bit or a 16 bit processor. With the advent of the 6809, Z-8000 and 8086, we now have available a hybrid machine with both 8 and 16 bit capabilities. This may have an effect on how language are written on the processors. Charles H Forsyth and Randall J Howard take a look at this in Compilation and Pascal on the New Microprocessors. page 50

p.50 Until now microprocessor users had the choice of using either an 8 bit or a 16 bit processor. With the advent of the 6809, Z-8000 and 8086, we now have available a hybrid machine with both 8 and 16 bit capabilities. This may have an effect on how language are written on the processors. Charles H Forsyth and Randall J Howard take a look at this in Compilation and Pascal on the New Microprocessors. page 50

p.64 Do you need to perform extensive mathematical calculations, but fret over the time needed to write, debug and use floating point operations and transcendental functions? The new National Semiconductor MM57109 processor will help you with this problem. Turn to The Number Crunching Processor by Peter Nelson for details on how to interface an MM57109 with an 8080 system, and a review of this unique processor. page 64

p.64 Do you need to perform extensive mathematical calculations, but fret over the time needed to write, debug and use floating point operations and transcendental functions? The new National Semiconductor MM57109 processor will help you with this problem. Turn to The Number Crunching Processor by Peter Nelson for details on how to interface an MM57109 with an 8080 system, and a review of this unique processor. page 64

p.78 Pascal is the fastest growing new computer language. Few languages have the support from the typical university computer science department that Pascal has. To find out more about this fascinating language read Steven R Alpert's article, Pascal, a Structurally Strong Language. page 78

p.78 Pascal is the fastest growing new computer language. Few languages have the support from the typical university computer science department that Pascal has. To find out more about this fascinating language read Steven R Alpert's article, Pascal, a Structurally Strong Language. page 78

p.90 A 179 year old android that can draw pictures and write poetry? It may sound like science fiction, but The Franklin Institute's Charles F Penniman reveals all in Philadelphia's 179 Year Old Android. page 90

p.90 A 179 year old android that can draw pictures and write poetry? It may sound like science fiction, but The Franklin Institute's Charles F Penniman reveals all in Philadelphia's 179 Year Old Android. page 90

p.96 This month we continue Dr James Williams' 3 part series on Antique Mechanical Computers with Part 2: 18th and 19th Century Mechanical Marvels . Read about Jacquet-Droz's incredible writing and drawing automaton that contains the equivalent of three quarters of a million bits of read only memory and can draw intricate pictures and transcribe poetry. page 96

p.96 This month we continue Dr James Williams' 3 part series on Antique Mechanical Computers with Part 2: 18th and 19th Century Mechanical Marvels . Read about Jacquet-Droz's incredible writing and drawing automaton that contains the equivalent of three quarters of a million bits of read only memory and can draw intricate pictures and transcribe poetry. page 96

p.110 Using a structured language such as Pascal helps the programmer easily organize the logic of a program. Often, it is not necessary to write a logic diagram for the program. To this end, David Mundie compares a well written Pascal program to a Warnier-Orr logic diagram in his article In Praise of Pascal. page 110

p.110 Using a structured language such as Pascal helps the programmer easily organize the logic of a program. Often, it is not necessary to write a logic diagram for the program. To this end, David Mundie compares a well written Pascal program to a Warnier-Orr logic diagram in his article In Praise of Pascal. page 110

p.122 Business applications for personal computers are more and more in evidence these days. Pascal lends itself well to business applications with the addition of some special features described by Ken Bowles in Pascal versus COBOL. page 122

p.122 Business applications for personal computers are more and more in evidence these days. Pascal lends itself well to business applications with the addition of some special features described by Ken Bowles in Pascal versus COBOL. page 122

p.143 One of the newest developments in software is structured programming. Many features of the technique have been described, but often the actual procedure for constructing a structured program is not mentioned. Chip Weems describes the steps involved in Designing a Structured Program. page 143

p.143 One of the newest developments in software is structured programming. Many features of the technique have been described, but often the actual procedure for constructing a structured program is not mentioned. Chip Weems describes the steps involved in Designing a Structured Program. page 143

p.156 Light pens are one way to improve the user-computer interface, but there's an even more direct way: a noncontact scanning digitizer. Simply touch the screen of your video display to enter information! Steve Ciarcia shows you how in Let Your Fingers Do the Talking: Add a Noncontact Touch Scanner to Your Video Display. page 156

p.156 Light pens are one way to improve the user-computer interface, but there's an even more direct way: a noncontact scanning digitizer. Simply touch the screen of your video display to enter information! Steve Ciarcia shows you how in Let Your Fingers Do the Talking: Add a Noncontact Touch Scanner to Your Video Display. page 156

p.166 If you like to gamble, but don't want to wait for legalized gambling in your state, try JACPOT. Author Edwin Hastings has written a straightforward BASIC simulation of a slot machine. Now you can gamble (for fun only, of course) to your heart's content without depleting your bank account. You can lose everything and then turn around and lose it again! page 166

p.166 If you like to gamble, but don't want to wait for legalized gambling in your state, try JACPOT. Author Edwin Hastings has written a straightforward BASIC simulation of a slot machine. Now you can gamble (for fun only, of course) to your heart's content without depleting your bank account. You can lose everything and then turn around and lose it again! page 166

p.168 Pascal is an exciting language that can help you program more efficiently. It was developed in 1969 as an extension of the ALGOL family of languages. Author Allan Schwartz compares Pascal to BASIC, a language familiar to many BYTE readers, in Pascal versus BASIC: An Exercise. page 168

p.168 Pascal is an exciting language that can help you program more efficiently. It was developed in 1969 as an extension of the ALGOL family of languages. Author Allan Schwartz compares Pascal to BASIC, a language familiar to many BYTE readers, in Pascal versus BASIC: An Exercise. page 168