Vol.3 n°3 march 1978

Vol.3 n°3 march 1978

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

Foreground

p.84 PROGRAM YOUR NEXT EROM IN BASIC

[theme : Memory] [author : Ciarcia]

p.178 INTERFACING THE SYKES OEM FLOPPY DISK KIT TO A COMPUTER

[theme : Hardware] [author : Hughes]

p.185 GET ON AT THE RIGHT ADDRESS

[theme : Hardware] [author : Holman]

Background

p.8 A TWO COMPUTER MUSIC SYSTEM

[theme : Music Hardware] [author : Critchfield-Dwyer-Lederer]

p.18 AN APPLE TO BYTE

[theme : Product Description] [author : Helmers]

p.56 THE MICROCOMPUTER AND THE PIPE ORGAN

[theme : Music Software] [author : Raskin]

p.74 THE BRAINS OF MEN AND MACHINES: How the Brain Analyzes Output

[theme : Robotics] [author : Kent]

p.114 USER'S REPORT: THE PET 2001

[theme : Product Description] [author : Fylstra]

p.152 CIE NET: A DESIGN FOR A NETWORK

[theme : Personal Computing Networks] [author : Wilber]

p.166 MICROCHESS 1.5 VERSUS DARK HORSE

[theme : Chess] [author : Jennings]

p.168 TAKE A COURSE IN MICROPROGRAMMING

[theme : Course Description] [author : Millan]

p.174 CONTROLLING THE REAL WORLD

[theme : Applications] [author : Olson]

p.186 THE INTELLIGENT MEMORY BLOCK

[theme : System Design] [author : Castleman]

Nucleus

p.4 In This BYTE

p.6 Don't Ignore the High End... or My Search for Manuscript Editing Paradise

p.6 Some Enticing Advance Words

p.14 Letters

p.27, 151 BYTE's Bits

p.46 BYTE's Bugs

p.110 Book Reviews

p.148 Technical Forum: The Altair (S-100) Bus Forum : PCC 77

p.170 Programming Quickies

p.172 Clubs, Newsletters

p.194, 204, 214 What's New?

p.222 Classified Ads

p.224 BOMB

p.224 Reader Service

In this BYTE

About the Cover... This month, Robert Tinney has created an oil painting on the theme of "Organs of Computers." Two articles in this issue concern the prospect of using a personal computer system for the editing and playing of music using pipe organs under electronic control, a prospect which is emphasized by the typical small system in place of the organist. A grand pipe organ facade and red carpet emphasize the regal nature of this king of instruments - with its new servant the small computer.

p.8 The Soloworks lab at the University of Pittsburgh has been conducting experiments with computers for some time. One of their areas of interest is computer music. Jeffrey Lederer, Tom Dwyer and Margot Critchfield of that organization describe their experiments with pipe organs and a new high level music language called MUSIC in A Two Computer Music System. Page 8

p.18 The Apple II is one of several examples of fully assembled "appliance" computers available coast to coast off the shelf in computer stores. Read An Apple to Byte for a user's reations to this product, and an example of a simple "color sketchpad" application implemented on the Apple II. Page 18

p.56 If you don't know your Rauschepfeife from your Holtzregal, perhaps The Microcomputer and the Pipe Organ by Jef Raskin can help. The article introduces readers to pipe organ technology and gives valuable advice to the enterprising experimenter who wants to experiment with programmed passacaglias on a Grossemischung. Page 56

p.74 The study of biological neural computers is an important input to thought and design of robotic systems. This issue contains Ernest W Kent's third article in a series on The Brains of Men and Machines. This installment, How the Brain Analyzes Input, gives essential background information on the organization and operation of sensory processing in the nervous systems of mammals such as man. Page 74

p.84 Would you like to do your own EROM programming, but don't know how to begin? Read Steve Ciarcia's Program Your Next EROM in BASIC. You'll find an inexpensive circuit for programming and erasing these useful devices. Page 84

p.114 We have seen advance publicity and claims about the PET 2001 by Commodore for some time now. In this issue, Dan Fylstra reports on the realities of The PET 2001 which arrived at his door October 11 1977. Page 114

p.152 In part 2 of his 3 part series on CIE Net: A Design for a Network of Community Information Exchanges, Mike Wilber presents the detailed protocols designed for various types of messages between users and between intelligent nodes of the network itself. Page 152

p.166 Readers of the January 1978 BYTE may recall Dark Horse, one of the computer program contenders for the World Computer Chess Championship. This month, Peter Jennings' Microchess program makes a valiant effort to beat the favorite in Microchess 1.5 versus Dark Horse. Page 166

p.168 Have you ever thought you might like to Take a Course in Microprogramming? Richard Mac Millan gives his reactions upon taking such a course from the Wintek Corporation. His information may help you decide if the course you think you might like to take is just what you had in mind. Page 168

p.174 A really useful microcomputer should be able to control the environment around it. To do this it must be capable of controlling electronic devices which are not TTL compatible. Hank Olson describes several ways of doing this in Controlling the Real World. Page 174

p.178 A mass storage system is essential to the truly usable personal computer. One option for obtaining mass storage is presented in this issue by Phil Hughes' article Interfacing the Sykes OEM Floppy Disk Kit to a Personal Computer. Page 178

p.186 With the cost of microprocessors so low, the barriers to a multiprocessor capability go down. Rather than adding a memory region to your system, why not consider the concept of adding a combined memory and microprocessor subsystem. With an appropriate multiport memory region and control logic, Ken R Castleman's The Intelligent Memory Block is a very real possibility for the homebrewer with higher thruput as a goal. Page 186