Vol.2 n°10 october 1977

Vol.2 n°10 october 1977

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

Foreground

p.26 RELOCATABILITY AND THE LONG BRANCH

p.26 RELOCATABILITY AND THE LONG BRANCH

[theme : Programming Techniques] [author : 8orrmann]

p.64 AN APL INTERPRETER FOR MICROCOMPUTERS, Part 3

p.64 AN APL INTERPRETER FOR MICROCOMPUTERS, Part 3

[theme : Interpreter Design] [author : Wimble]

p.86 HOW TO IMPLEMENT SPACE WAR

p.86 HOW TO IMPLEMENT SPACE WAR

[theme : Software] [author : Kruglinski]

p.166 ANALYZE YOUR CAR'S GAS ECONOMY WITH YOUR COMPUTER

p.166 ANALYZE YOUR CAR'S GAS ECONOMY WITH YOUR COMPUTER

[theme : Applications] [author : Bauerschnub]

Background

p.18 HOW TO WRITE AN APPLICATION PROGRAM

p.18 HOW TO WRITE AN APPLICATION PROGRAM

[theme : Software] [author : Jenkins]

p.60 OTHELLO, A NEW ANCIENT GAME

p.60 OTHELLO, A NEW ANCIENT GAME

[theme : Software] [author : Duda]

p.70 AN 8080 SIMULATOR

p.70 AN 8080 SIMULATOR

[theme : Software] [author : Chung]

p.114 FUNDAMENTALS OF SEQUENTIAL FILE PROCESSING

p.114 FUNDAMENTALS OF SEQUENTIAL FILE PROCESSING

[theme : Applications] [author : Smith]

p.130 C: A LANGUAGE FOR MICROPROCESSORS?

p.130 C: A LANGUAGE FOR MICROPROCESSORS?

[theme : Languages] [author : Madden]

p.140 SIMPLE APPROACHES TO COMPUTER MUSIC SYNTHESIS

p.140 SIMPLE APPROACHES TO COMPUTER MUSIC SYNTHESIS

[theme : Hardware] [author : Schneider]

p.146 STRUCTURED PROGRAM DESIGN

p.146 STRUCTURED PROGRAM DESIGN

[theme : Software Design] [author : Higgins]

p.156 COMPUTER INFORMATION ARRANGEMENT

p.156 COMPUTER INFORMATION ARRANGEMENT

[theme : Applications] [author : Holladay]

p.168 MASTERMIND

p.168 MASTERMIND

[theme : Games] [author : Milligan]

Nucleus

p.4 In This BYTE

p.4 In This BYTE

p.6 The Colorful Future of Personal Computing

p.6 The Colorful Future of Personal Computing

p.11 Letters

p.11 Letters

p.22 About the Cover ... and Some More of the Same

p.22 About the Cover ... and Some More of the Same

p.30 Languages Forum : Defining LIL, a Little Interpretive Language

p.30 Languages Forum : Defining LIL, a Little Interpretive Language

p.50 Commodore's New PET Computer

p.50 Commodore's New PET Computer

p.54 The NCC: A Dallas Delight

p.54 The NCC: A Dallas Delight

p.58 Technical Forum: More on Inexpensive Plotters

p.58 Technical Forum: More on Inexpensive Plotters

p.160 Book Reviews

p.160 Book Reviews

p.172 BYTE's Bits

p.172 BYTE's Bits

p.174 BYTE's Bugs

p.174 BYTE's Bugs

p.177 Clubs, Newsletters

p.177 Clubs, Newsletters

p.184 Ask BYTE

p.184 Ask BYTE

p.190,198 What's New?

p.190,198 What's New?

p.194 Classified Ads

p.194 Classified Ads

p.208 BOMB

p.208 BOMB

p.208 Reader Service

p.208 Reader Service

In this BYTE

One whole subset of the personal computing world is provided by the users and manufacturers of programmable calculators. All the problems of creating applications software which users must solve on bigger machines are present, and often intensified by lack of scale, in these smallest of personal computers. William B Jenkins gives some useful information on the general process of creating an application program, and the specific problems of doing it on an SR-52 programmable calculator, in his article entitled How to Write an Application Program.

One of the conveniences of the 6800, 6502 and similar microprocessors is a relative branch method which allows one to construct position independent code which can be relocated by simply moving the programs involved. But these forms are typically limited to a 1 byte displacement, a limitation which Robert Borrmann shows how to overcome in the 6800 case by using appropriate stack manipulations and "long branch" subroutines. Read his article Relocatability and the Long Branch in this issue.

Looking for a different type of board game to play on your computer? How about the current game fad Othello (known as Reversi in England)? In Othello, a New Ancient Game Richard O Duda provides a short article with details for this game of skill and tactics.

This month, Mike Wimble concludes his 3 part series about an APL interpreter with An APL Interpreter for Microcomputers, Part 3: Mathematical Processing. With this segment, the functional design of interpreter is completed. Watch future issues for results of the Great APL Interpreter Contest inspired by Mike's article.

At first glance a simulator designed to run on the computer it is simulating may not seem very useful. Kin-man Chung feels differently for he wrote one. His article, An 8080 Simulator, describes one such program and gives ideas on how it can be put to good use.

For those who tire of the many versions of the Star Trek game, there are many much more interesting and interactive graphics games to consider. In his article, How to Implement Space War, Dave Kruglinski provides readers with a version of the classic graphics game, Space War, which was originated in the early 1960s by students at MIT, and has taken an amazingly long time to be documented in versions for personal computers. Dave's 8080 version is complete with orbiting space ships, spiraling torpedoes and dynamic effects implemented with limited resolution point plotting graphic display.

Is your computer cold ? Add some vitamin C for a new high in resistance to frustration and rude language. Turn to J Gregory Madden's C: A Language for Microprocessors?, a description of an excellent structured programming language which could be adapted to microprocessor use from its origins on large PDP-11s with the Unix operating system.

Do you use cassettes as your principal mass storage medium? Then you will benefit from Wayne D Smith's discussion of Fundamentals of Sequential File Processing when it comes time to write software using such media.

Want to get involved in pitch generation for computer music synthesis? Thomas Schneider explains several approaches you might consider in his article, Simple Approaches to Computer Music Synthesis.

Using flowcharts to gather the logic for a program does not mesh with the current trend of structured programming. One technique that is directed towards the structured program approach is the use of Warnier-Orr diagrams. Use of these diagrams, as described by David Higgins in his article Structured Program Design , will result in accurate, well structured programs that will work correctly the first time they are executed.

The home computer has many uses besides number crunching and game playing. One of these uses, discussed by David Holladay in Computer Information Arrangement, is an information retrieval system. This type of system could be used to make your own dictionary type reference, help keep track of your files with cross reference, or simply make a personal version of the Schwann Catalog for your record collection.

Sensible automobile owners have long had the habit of recording mileage and gasoline filling figures at each visit to the service station. In this issue John P Bauernschub explains how to Analyze Your Car's Gas Economy with Your Computer in a short article presenting a complete BASIC program for this application.

Are you looking for a stimulating thought game to play with your computer? The game of Mastermind as described by W Lloyd Milligan in his article of that name will force you to think in a very logical manner if you want to have a chance at winning.