Vol.2 n°9 september 1977

Vol.2 n°9 september 1977

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

Foreground

p.12 SCORTOS: IMPLEMENTATION OF A MUSIC LANGUAGE

p.12 SCORTOS: IMPLEMENTATION OF A MUSIC LANGUAGE

[theme : Software, Music] [author : Taylor]

p.30 CONTROL THE WORLD! (OR AT LEAST A FEW ANALOG POINTS)

p.30 CONTROL THE WORLD! (OR AT LEAST A FEW ANALOG POINTS)

[theme : Peripheral Interfaces] [author : Ciarcia]

p.62 TECHNIQUES FOR COMPUTER PERFORMANCES OF MUSIC

p.62 TECHNIQUES FOR COMPUTER PERFORMANCES OF MUSIC

[theme : Computer Music] [author : Chamberlin]

p.84 TUNE IN WITH SOME CHIPS

p.84 TUNE IN WITH SOME CHIPS

[theme : Applications] [author : Sierad]

p.126 AN APL INTERPRETER FOR MICROCOMPUTERS, Part 2

p.126 AN APL INTERPRETER FOR MICROCOMPUTERS, Part 2

[theme : Interpreter Design] [author : Wimble]

Background

p.26 A NEW DRESS FOR KIM

p.26 A NEW DRESS FOR KIM

[theme : Design] [author : Atkins]

p.44 EXPANDING THE TINY ASSEMBLER

p.44 EXPANDING THE TINY ASSEMBLER

[theme : Software Design] [author : Emmerichs]

p.54 ONE-SIDED VIEW OF WIRE WRAP SOCKETS

p.54 ONE-SIDED VIEW OF WIRE WRAP SOCKETS

[theme : Hardware] [author : Rampil]

p.102 THE NOVAL 760

p.102 THE NOVAL 760

[theme : System Description] [author : Hauck-Nash]

p.112 NOTES ON INTERFACING PLAYER PIANOS

p.112 NOTES ON INTERFACING PLAYER PIANOS

[theme : Music Peripherals] [author : Helmers]

p.122 NOTES ON ANATOMY: THE PIANO'S REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM

p.122 NOTES ON ANATOMY: THE PIANO'S REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM

[theme : Software History] [author : Morgan]

p.190 WALSH FUNCTIONS: A DIGITAL FOURIER SERIES

p.190 WALSH FUNCTIONS: A DIGITAL FOURIER SERIES

[theme : Interface Technology] [author : Jacoby]

p.4 In this BYTE

p.4 In this BYTE

p.6 Reflections on Entry into Our Third Year

p.6 Reflections on Entry into Our Third Year

p.8 Letters

p.8 Letters

p.25 Alphanumeric Music

p.25 Alphanumeric Music

p.50 Review: Heuristics Speech Lab

p.50 Review: Heuristics Speech Lab

p.59 Technical Forum: Personal Computer Network

p.59 Technical Forum: Personal Computer Network

Adding New Transcendentals to Limited BASICs

On Finite State Machines and Their Uses

Comments on Floating Point Representation

p.97 Ask BYTE

p.97 Ask BYTE

p.110, 210, 216 What's New?

p.110, 210, 216 What's New?

p.166, 200 BYTE's Bits

p.166, 200 BYTE's Bits

p.172 BYTE's Bugs

p.172 BYTE's Bugs

p.186 Clubs, Newsletters

p.186 Clubs, Newsletters

p.202 Book Reviews

p.202 Book Reviews

p.222 Classified Ads

p.222 Classified Ads

p.224 BOMB

p.224 BOMB

p.224 Reader Service

p.224 Reader Service

In this BYTE

About the Cover: The conceptual target of the cover painting for September was a theme of music and sound. Taking this theme, Robert Tinney implemented this cover, entitled "Breaking the Sound Barrier." It was inspired by the legend of opera star Enrico Caruso breaking a wine glass through sympathetic resonances with his voice. The sound barrier we're referring to, of course, is the physical barrier between a program and the real world, which is crossed by one of a number of musical and audio output devices and software presently on the market or about to come to the marketplace.

Experimenting with music on your computer can be very rewarding. If you're looking for a streamlined way to input musical material into your system, look no further. Hal Taylor shows you how in SCORTOS: Implementation of a Music Language. Who knows, with SCORTOS you could have your synthesized concerto for alpenhorn and orchestra up, running and debugged by next week.

A naked microcomputer board is unprotected from a harsh environment. In his article this month, R Travis Atkins turns couturier as he fashions external garb in the form of A New Dress for KIM.

Steve Ciarcia returns this month with a combination of tutorial ideas and practical details so characteristic of his style. Read Steve's Control the World! (Or at Least a Few Analog Points) to review digital to analog conversion, and learn how BASIC can be used to compute and represent wave forms through a converter using a scope as a display.

A Tiny Assembler need not have tiny features, as Jack Emmerichs explains in his article on Expanding the Tiny Assembler. Jack adds structured programming features and incremental improvements to the Tiny Assembler design he described in April and May issues of BYTE this year. By reorganizing the symbol table to add the "begin" pseudo operation, "Tiny" takes on a number of "big" features while preserving practical operation as Version 3.1 in under 4 K bytes of memory.

Looking for a very simple way to build a wire wrap board? Ira Rampil has an idea in A One-Sided View of Wire Wrap Sockets.

Are you interested in making music with your computer? Hal Chamberlin's A Sampling of Techniques for Computer Performance of Music is one of the best ways to get acquainted with this fascinating field. The article will give you complete directions for creating 4 part harmony on your microprocessor for a very modest investment. Get out those 4 voice fugues that have been languishing in your music drawer and bring them to life!

Did you ever want your computer to sing you a lullaby? Well, as Ted Sierad points out, it's not too hard to do so if you Tune In With Some Chips, using the circuit and software he describes.

The roster of "complete" computer systems for the amateur computing person expanded considerably with the introduction of the Noval 760. Turn to an account by designers Lane T Hauck and James D Nash, System Description: the Noval 760, for details of the philosophy and overall design behind this product.

A double feature written by Carl Helmers and Chris Morgan of BYTE covers key details of an interesting musically oriented peripheral which can be added to the personal computer: acoustic pianos with pneumatic player actions . Notes on Anatomy: The Piano's Reproductive System gives global morphology of a Duo-Art upright reproducing piano. Notes on Interfacing Pneumatic Player Pianos covers some details of how to engineer a computer interface for the pneumatic control lines using valve elements manufactured for the pipe organ industry .

With this issue, readers will note the continued progression of information on APL, and several articles introducing the theme of music representation and performance with computers. Readers can look forward to further information on these themes in future issues.

APL is one of the most interesting high level languages around these days. If you want to continue learning what goes on in an APL interpreter, read part 2 of Mike Wimble's An APL Interpreter for Microcomputers. Here Mike covers the expression evaluation sections of the interpreter.

Many people are familiar with use of orthogonal basis functions such as sines and cosines to compute arbitrary waveforms. But how many readers have heard of Walsh Functions: A Digital Fourier Series which forms arbitrary repetitive waveforms as weighted sums of digital waveforms? Read Benjamin F Jacoby's tutorial to find out a bit about these functions and their generation.