Vol.2 n°5 may 1977

Vol.2 n°5 may 1977

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

p.3 In the Queue (table of contents)

Foreground

p.17 A CATALOG OF LIBERATING HOME COMPUTER CONCEPTS

p.17 A CATALOG OF LIBERATING HOME COMPUTER CONCEPTS

[theme : Speculations] [author : Lau]

p.34 THE APPLE-II

p.34 THE APPLE-II

[theme : System Description] [author : Wozniak]

p.56 INTERFACING WITH AN ANALOG WORLD-Part 1

p.56 INTERFACING WITH AN ANALOG WORLD-Part 1

[theme : Peripherals] [author : Carr]

p.62 WHAT'S IN A FLOATING POINT PACKAGE?

p.62 WHAT'S IN A FLOATING POINT PACKAGE?

[theme : Software] [author : Linker]

p.98 A GUIDE TO BAUDOT MACHINES: Part 2

p.98 A GUIDE TO BAUDOT MACHINES: Part 2

[theme : Interfaces] [author : McNatt]

p.132 ALL THIS JUST TO PRINT A QUOTATION MARK?

p.132 ALL THIS JUST TO PRINT A QUOTATION MARK?

[theme : Software] [author : Chapman]

p.136 8080 PROGRAMMING NOTES

p.136 8080 PROGRAMMING NOTES

[theme : Software] [author : Krystosek-McCarty]

Background

p.26 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, AN EVOLUTIONARY IDEA: Part 1

p.26 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, AN EVOLUTIONARY IDEA: Part 1

[theme : Software] [author : Wimble]

p.50 COME UPSTAIRS AND BE RESPECTABLE

p.50 COME UPSTAIRS AND BE RESPECTABLE

[theme : Hardware] [author : Ciarcia]

p.76 USING A KEYBOARD ROM

p.76 USING A KEYBOARD ROM

[theme : Hardware] [author : Brehm]

p.84 IMPLEMENTING THE TINY ASSEMBLER

p.84 IMPLEMENTING THE TINY ASSEMBLER

[theme : Software] [author : Emmerichs]

Nucleus

p.4 In This BYTE

p.4 In This BYTE

p.6 Surveying the Field

p.6 Surveying the Field

p.10 Letters

p.10 Letters

p.46, 121, 143 What's New?

p.46, 121, 143 What's New?

p.68, 142 Technical Forum

p.68, 142 Technical Forum

p.116,127,152 BYTE's Bits

p.116,127,152 BYTE's Bits

p.117 New ASCII Standards

p.117 New ASCII Standards

p.120 Classified Ads

p.120 Classified Ads

p.128 BYTE'S Bugs

p.128 BYTE'S Bugs

p.145 Solution to 8080 Bug in the Stack

p.145 Solution to 8080 Bug in the Stack

p.145 Answer to Bar Code Puzzle

p.145 Answer to Bar Code Puzzle

p.146 Book Reviews

p.146 Book Reviews

p.148 Ask BYTE

p.148 Ask BYTE

p.156 Clubs, Newsletters

p.156 Clubs, Newsletters

p.176 BOMB

p.176 BOMB

p.176 Reader Service

p.176 Reader Service

In this BYTE

About the Cover

Birgit Quednau, a student of biomedical technique at the university in Giessen, Germany, who is interested in small computer systems and batik, combined both fascinations to produce this month's cover, another winning entry in BYTE's Computer Art Contest.

Ideas and imagination are the inputs to creative uses of computers. Ted M Lau has set down some of his thoughts on potential personalized uses of computers in his Catalog of Liberating Home Computer Concepts. Some of his suggestions can be implemented with present technology. Some will have to await further development. In either case the prospects are exciting.

Artificial intelligence has intrigued people for many years. The possibility that computers may be able to "think on their own" is one of the recurring themes of science fiction. Artificial intelligence is starting to pervade reality, not the super thinking beasts of fiction, but the machines that perform tasks normally thought to require intelligence. In his article, Artificial Intelligence, an Evolutionary Idea, Michael Wimble describes one type of artificial intelligence technique which readers may find quite useful.

What does it take to make a computer system complete to the point of plugging it into the wall, plugging it into a color television, and turning it on? Stephen Wozniak of Apple Computer describes the design of such a system in his product description article on the Apple-II.

Now that you have your microprocessor up and running you surely want to parade it before some of your friends and relatives. Your cluttered basement or garage workshop, however, may not be the best place to demonstrate your brainchild. In his article, Come Upstairs and Be Respectable, Steve Ciarcia describes his solution to this dilemma by installing a remote keyboard and video monitor in his den. This arrangement is great for parties and other gatherings since the vital components of the processor cannot be subjected to the whims of some unknowledgeable person.

Joseph J Carr , in his first of a two part article on interfacing With an Analog World, gives us an insight in to transducers and some of the problems of processing their outputs into signals which can be digitized by an analog to digital converter.

Adding floating point calculation abilities to your microprocessor can represent a quantum leap forward in performance. The floating point functions discussed by Sheldon Linker in his article, What's in a Floating Point Package? , will allow you to perform addition, subtraction, multiplication and division with extremely large or small numbers, using software exclusively.

How can you convert one of those surplus keyboards with out encoders into a usable text input? Find out by reading Bob Brehm's Using a Keyboard ROM.

Jack Emmerichs' Tiny Assembler presentation is completed in the second part of his article in this issue: Implementing the Tiny Assembler. Readers will find a discussion of structured code details for a 6800 as well as complete object code and sufficient information to get Tiny Assembler 6800 up and running in any machine with MIKBUG and at least 4 K of memory starting at address 0000.

Last month Michael S McNatt described the various types of Baudot teleprinters that are available on the surplus market today. This month he describes various ways in which these devices can be interfaced to a microprocessor using both hardware and software techniques in his article, A Guide to Baudot Machines: Part 2, Interfacing Techniques.

Using someone else's interpreter or compiler is the normal mode of operation for anyone contemplating a high level language. But with any complicated piece of software, use sometimes requires a bit of ingenuity on the part of the user as David Chapman points out in his description of a nit in many a BASIC interpreter. Turn to All This Just to Print a Quotation Mark? You'll also find a short glossary including some very important terms in the world of applications software.

The 8080 microprocessor generally performs operations using 8 bit words. There are, however, several ways in which 16 bit words can be manipulated on the 8080. In the article, 8080 Programming Notes, John McCarty and Paul Krystosek elucidate on 16 bit data manipulation.